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Gregory D. Stevens

Expert Profile

Gregory D. Stevens

Assistant Professor of Research, Center for Community Health Studies
Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California
Expertise: 
community health and health care
access to care, quality of care and health status of vulnerable U.S. populations
children's health insurance and California's Healthy Kids program
health policy analysis
primary health care for children

Biography

Gregory D. Stevens is an assistant professor of community health at the Keck School of Medicine at USC. Stevens is co-author of "Vulnerable Populations in the United States," published by Jossey-Bass in November 2004. "Vulnerable Populations" offers in-depth data and analysis on questions such as access to care, quality of care and health status. Currently, Stevens coordinates an evaluation planning effort for a statewide child health insurance expansion initiative called "Healthy Kids." Before that, he served as a senior researcher with the UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities. Stevens also examined primary care for children at the Center for Child Health Outcomes at Children's Hospital of San Diego and also served as health policy analyst at the Bureau of Primary Health Care in the Health Resources and Services Administration. Stevens holds a Ph.D. and an M.H.S. in health care policy from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Keith Administration Building KAM-B-10
1975 Zonal Ave.
Los Angeles  California  90089
United States
Office Phone: 
(626) 457-4049
Office Fax: 
(626) 457-5858

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Thanks to groundbreaking new research, we can now see how much private insurance plans are paying for common procedures and per person in communities across the U.S. This webinar will help journalists and policy makers contextualize the private-payer data, discuss possible policy responses, and offer suggestions for how reporters can use this resource to bolster their reporting. Register here.

Interested in learning more about the health, education and social challenges children face as a result of poverty and adversity?  Apply now for the 2016 National Health Journalism Fellowship, which comes with $2,000-$10,000 reporting grant, five days of intensive all-expenses-paid traing in L.A., and six months of mentoring. Details here.

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