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Children's Health Matters

Children's Health Matters, a column edited by journalist Ryan White, along with other collaborators, shares the latest research, journalism and ideas on pediatric health and child development outcomes; prevention models to reduce health disparities for ill children and children born into poverty; and trends in children's health and well-being.

Picture of Giles Bruce
A new study in Health Affairs finds that more than 70% of children on public coverage have a parent employed by a large firm.
Picture of Fran Smith
Too often, a woman and her doctor have to guess whether a drug is safe, because very few studies have looked at the effects of medications during pregnancy.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Four news outlets have taken impressive, in-depth looks at how and why children are dying after surgeries to repair damaged hearts since 2014. So what's going on here?
Picture of William Heisel
The zeal with which we turn to childhood adversity as a root cause of so many things borders on the religious, argues contributor Bill Heisel.
Picture of Giles Bruce
There’s more information known about every man, woman and child in the U.S. than ever before, in digital form. Why not use that data to protect the youngest, most vulnerable members of society?
Picture of Fran Smith
The suicide rate for boys ages 15 to 19 jumped dramatically in 2017, reaching its highest point in a generation.
Picture of Maggie Clark
Very little is known about how well any individual Medicaid managed care plan is delivering quality care to the children it covers, resulting in a big accountability problem.
Picture of Priska Neely
Black babies in the U.S. are twice as likely to die as white babies in their first year. When I heard this decades-old statistic for the first time, it me like a slap to the face.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
A journalist decided to write letters to 103 young people serving sentences in Florida prisons for murders. Could their stories shed light on what made Duval County Florida's "murder capital"?
Picture of Giles Bruce
“It’s been a very welcoming climate to insuring children,” said Joan Alker, director of Georgetown's Center for Children and Families. “That welcome mat has been pulled back.”

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It’s a quiet but growing crisis: Job-based health plans have become unaffordable for a growing share of the 156 million Americans who rely on them. Get the full story with our next Health Matters webinar. Sign-up here!

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