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The Health Divide

The Health Divide blog explores the ways in which health is shaped by factors outside of the doctor’s office. We’ll look at the conditions where people live and work, and the influence of race, class and immigration status. Such factors can have an outsize role in determining individual and community well-being, influencing how long we live and the quality of our lives. We’ll highlight and hope to spur great journalism around these themes — and hope to hear of work in the journalism and policy sphere that our readers admire. We’ll also look at the health care policy landscape and efforts to close the gap between the haves and have nots when it comes to health.

 

 

Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
The Trump administration's recent efforts to shrink the social safety net will only make treating the real drivers of health harder.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
A network of regional "task forces" is tackling the opioid problem throughout California, leading to a dramatic drop in overdoses in one rural mountain county.
Picture of John Gonzales
Alameda County saw a dramatic dip in its black infant mortality rate in the late 2000s. What can we learn from the county's success — and what went wrong since then?
Picture of Keren Landman
Teenage pregnancy isn't typically thought of as a problem for sexual minorities — yet their risk of pregnancy is often higher. The possible explanations are complicated.
Picture of Pendarvis Harshaw
In a community known as Deep East Oakland, health care providers and nonprofits are seeking new ways to inform and treat those living with asthma.
Picture of Jonathan Kahn
If racism is reduced to a biological bug, who needs a March on Washington to promote racial justice when you have the right pill for the job?
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
In one immigrant community along Central California's coast, a crisis response team stands ready to coordinate services for families who’ve been hit by an arrest or deportation.
Picture of ChrisAnna Mink
STDs have been on the rise nationwide for the past five years, and South LA has some of the highest rates in the county. The problem is driven in part by high levels of racial segregation.
Picture of Georges Benjamin
The Clean Air Act’s impact has been greatest on those who live next to industry and highways, where toxic emissions are highest. Such “fence-line communities” typically harbor poorer people and minorities.
Picture of John Gonzales
In California, Alameda County’s success in saving lives has not been replicated statewide — and an already appalling gap between white and black infant death has grown since then.

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