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The Health Divide

The Health Divide explores the ways in which persistent disparities and inequities shape health in this country, with a focus on the role played by social factors outside of the doctor’s office. We look at the conditions where people live and work, and the influence of race, class and immigration status. We look at the health care policy landscape and efforts to close the gap between the haves and have nots when it comes to inequitable access and treatment in health care. The Health Divide explores the role of systemic racism and police violence as well as community safety and how such conditions can contribute to toxic stress and illness. Such factors can have an outsize role in determining individual and community well-being, influencing how long we live and the quality of our lives. We highlight great work around these themes in the journalism and policy sphere, and encourage our readers to weigh in with ideas.

Picture of Marc Philpart
Public officials come under fire for budgets that prioritize law enforcement and shortchange community health and safety.
Picture of Jacqueline García
As DACA is spared, a journalist reflects on the program that helped her realize her dreams, get a job, and tell the stories of people forced to live in the shadows.
Picture of Nuala Sawyer
City leaders repeatedly denied that homeless sweeps were happening. A reporter shares how she proved them wrong.
Picture of Tracie Potts
A reporter reflects on the deeper issues behind a split-second decision she faced on air when asked for her reaction to George Floyd's death.
Picture of Sylvester Monroe
“My press pass used to shield me from police violence. Sadly, yours may not protect you.”
Picture of Elissa Lee
“With the shelter-in-place, we’ve really had to pivot,” said the director of California's census outreach team.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
How journalists of color can practice self-care, stay safe and advocate for fair coverage in their newsrooms.
Picture of Michelle Levander
As protests engulf our nation, now is the time to redouble our commitment to journalism that leads to a more just and equitable society.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The coronavirus pandemic has affected everyone — but not equally, with low-wage workers and communities of color especially hard hit.
Picture of Bulbul Rajagopal
Some of California's densest clusters of COVID-19 are in Los Angeles' richest areas.

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The Center for Health Journalism is dedicated to supporting journalists covering two of the biggest stories of our time — the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and inequities in America. We provide reporters with intensive training instituteswebinars and tips about craft and content and are providing deep and sustained support for reporters and their newsrooms in this historic and difficult moment. You can donate through the USC web portal at this link. Pressed for time? You can also text to donate! No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

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