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The Health Divide

The Health Divide explores the ways in which persistent disparities and inequities shape health in this country, with a focus on the role played by social factors outside of the doctor’s office. We look at the conditions where people live and work, and the influence of race, class and immigration status. We look at the health care policy landscape and efforts to close the gap between the haves and have nots when it comes to inequitable access and treatment in health care. The Health Divide explores the role of systemic racism and police violence as well as community safety and how such conditions can contribute to toxic stress and illness. Such factors can have an outsize role in determining individual and community well-being, influencing how long we live and the quality of our lives. We highlight great work around these themes in the journalism and policy sphere, and encourage our readers to weigh in with ideas.

Picture of Elizabeth Zach
A network of regional "task forces" is tackling the opioid problem throughout California, leading to a dramatic drop in overdoses in one rural mountain county.
Picture of Pendarvis Harshaw
In a community known as Deep East Oakland, health care providers and nonprofits are seeking new ways to inform and treat those living with asthma.
Picture of Jonathan Kahn
If racism is reduced to a biological bug, who needs a March on Washington to promote racial justice when you have the right pill for the job?
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
In one immigrant community along Central California's coast, a crisis response team stands ready to coordinate services for families who’ve been hit by an arrest or deportation.
Picture of Georges Benjamin
The Clean Air Act’s impact has been greatest on those who live next to industry and highways, where toxic emissions are highest. Such “fence-line communities” typically harbor poorer people and minorities.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
The outbreak in California, the largest since the U.S. started tracking hepatitis A, lays bare the fact that homelessness can be as much a cause of disease as the virus itself.
Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton
Trump's new budget wants to replace a portion of food stamp benefits with a box of "shelf-stable" items. For Native families who have endured such government-issued provisions in the past, that's a horrifying prospect.
Picture of Keren Landman
Young black and Latina transfeminine people are at an increased risk for homicide compared with their non-transgender peers, research finds.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
Rebuilding is expensive and draining for anyone caught in the path of a major storm. That's why such events tend to make existing disparities even worse.
Picture of Suzanne Bohan
In low-income neighborhoods beset by predatory lending and check-cashing hubs, options for building credit and savings are scarce. A credit union that opened last year seeks to change that.

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Announcements

A global pandemic, a national reckoning with racism, botched school reopenings and leadership vacuums — it's not an easy moment to be starting out as a journalist. Join us as we hear from three youth journalists from around the country as they discuss the massive challenges confronting their generation. Sign-up here

Ready to take your journalism to a new level by honing your data analysis and visualization skills?  We're offering our highly acclaimed annual Data Fellowship through Zoom from Nov. 30-Dec. 4.

Do you have a great idea for a potentially impactful reporting project on a health challenge in California?  Our 2020 Impact Fund can provide financial support and six months of mentoring.

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