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The Health Divide

The Health Divide explores the ways in which persistent disparities and inequities shape health in this country, with a focus on the role played by social factors outside of the doctor’s office. We look at the conditions where people live and work, and the influence of race, class and immigration status. We look at the health care policy landscape and efforts to close the gap between the haves and have nots when it comes to inequitable access and treatment in health care. The Health Divide explores the role of systemic racism and police violence as well as community safety and how such conditions can contribute to toxic stress and illness. Such factors can have an outsize role in determining individual and community well-being, influencing how long we live and the quality of our lives. We highlight great work around these themes in the journalism and policy sphere, and encourage our readers to weigh in with ideas.

Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton
Trump's new budget wants to replace a portion of food stamp benefits with a box of "shelf-stable" items. For Native families who have endured such government-issued provisions in the past, that's a horrifying prospect.
Picture of Keren Landman
Young black and Latina transfeminine people are at an increased risk for homicide compared with their non-transgender peers, research finds.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
Rebuilding is expensive and draining for anyone caught in the path of a major storm. That's why such events tend to make existing disparities even worse.
Picture of Suzanne Bohan
In low-income neighborhoods beset by predatory lending and check-cashing hubs, options for building credit and savings are scarce. A credit union that opened last year seeks to change that.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
When it comes to local communities, zip codes are rarely a good way to look for geographic differences, and can cloud whatever relationships a researcher might be looking for. Consider what happened in Flint.
Picture of Michelle Levander
With our new blog “The Health Divide,” our aim is to inspire conversations and help journalists portray how larger forces outside of the doctor’s office can shape community health.

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In this webinar, we'll look at how journalists can tell urgent stories as states reopen and workers are potentially forced to choose between their health and their economic survival. Sign-up here!

The Center for Health Journalism is dedicated to supporting journalists covering two of the biggest stories of our time -- the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and inequities in America. We provide reporters with intensive training instituteswebinars and tips about craft and content and are providing deep and sustained support for reporters and their newsrooms in this historic and difficult moment. You can donate through the USC web portal at this link: https://bit.ly/3c8d4xs  Pressed for time? You can also text to donate! No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

 

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