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Investigating Health

This column offers strategies and tips for producing investigative health stories. We highlight great coverage, talk to leading reporters in the field, point out resources and datasets rich with untold stories, and discuss how to navigate the roadblocks hard-hitting investigations often run up against.

Picture of William Heisel
What stories are you ignoring? What stories might be consuming too much of your bandwidth? Are you spending too much time with one particular source? It's worth scrutinizing your inbox periodically.
Picture of William Heisel
As a reporter, you can do your part by both exposing the problems discovered by regulatory bodies and exposing the big gaps in the regulatory safety net.
Picture of Joe Rubin
An investigative reporter for Capital & Main shares how data, investigative smarts and stubborn persistence eventually culminated in new state legislation.
Picture of William Heisel
Why you should investigate the unequal implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which turns 30 next year.
Picture of William Heisel
Nearly one out of every five kidneys donated in the United States ends up in the trash. At the same time, approximately 5,000 people die every year while waiting for a kidney.
Picture of Judith Garber
Hospitals should be able to tout their accomplishments, but doing it through sponsored news articles in The Boston Globe seems sneaky.
Picture of William Heisel
I first became interested in jail suicides when I was reporting on the state prison in Montana, where I found that murders were quite uncommon inside the prison — but suicides were not.
Picture of William Heisel
Your job when using someone as a source is to make sure you're letting your audience know everything about that source that is relevant to that story.
Picture of William Heisel
There's most likely a Superfund site near you. Here's why all that nasty toxic waste is ripe for sustained investigative reporting, as contributor Bill Heisel explains.
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
What’s the best way to vet the tips and decide which to pursue? These are the steps the Tampa Bay Times' deputy investigations editor takes and the records she seeks out.

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Do the competing bills put forward by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sens. Charles Grassley and Ron Wyden have a chance of becoming law? This webinar will give an overview of the proposals and weigh in on the future of the battle to curb soaring drug prices. Sign-up here!

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