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Remaking Health Care

This blog explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or whether Trumpcare will affect the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities. We also explore health care costs and whether Obamacare or its successor plans can live up the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman, David Lansky, executive director of the Pacific Business Group on Health, and independent health journalist Kellie SchmittRyan White, content editor of Center for Health Journalism Digital, serves as the blog's principal editor. 

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The historic defeat sent a signal to politicians that everyone needs health coverage, comprehensive benefits, and sick people can’t be left out.
Picture of Jeffrey McCombs
In Bakersfield, Calif., researchers found 30-day readmission rates dropped significantly when pharmacists where given a larger role in caring for patients.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Why not allow Medicare to negotiate lower prescription drug prices? Economists such as Neeraj Sood worry such a move would hamper crucial innovations over time. But not everyone agrees.
Picture of Mario Molina
"Our health care system remains in a crisis," writes the CEO of Molina Healthcare. "Both the AHCA and the ACA only address the funding of health care and fail to tackle the troubling rate at which health care costs are rising."
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The media critic in Jost laments that "so much coverage is focused on politics within the Republican Party, to a much greater extent than on what the legislation would specifically do."
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Conservative notions about the "undeserving poor" have returned with a vengeance in the debate over Medicaid, writes contributor Trudy Lieberman.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The Affordable Care Act has done far less to control health care costs than many media accounts would lead you to believe. Columnist Trudy Lieberman shows how reporters can cut through the spin.
Picture of Paul Keckley
In the age of fake news and alternative facts, party politics and the pursuit of media attention too often trump meaningful discussion and informed debate.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
A former journalist and single mother of two fears that changes to the Affordable Care Act could eliminate the coverage her family depends on to manage their complex health needs.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
"We are now in another war of words over health care," writes Trudy Lieberman, "and the first casualty, as in any war, is always truth." For examples, look no further than the recent dialogue on Medicare.

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