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Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. It also highlights the ways in which our current system is falling short on measures of coverage, access and affordability. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or how the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities is driving up costs. We also explore health care costs and whether the Affordable Care Act or its successor plans can live up to the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman and independent health journalist Kellie Schmitt, with occasional contributions from independent journalists such as Susan Abram and Sara Stewart.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
 What can we learn from the Italians, who by now are seasoned observers of the virus and the havoc it causes? An Italian health journalist shares reflections.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
To protect front-line workers, emergency departments are trying new ways of seeing patients via telehealth — even when they show up in person.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Now more than ever, reporters need to be ready to communicate coverage alternatives to their audiences as layoffs sweep the nation.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
A veteran health journalist checks in with reporters in the American heartland to see what they're covering — and how they're faring.
By Carol Peden, Michael Hochman and Barbara J. Turner
The outbreak represents a potential sea change in how health systems use telemedicine.
Picture of Van Ton-Quinlivan
There are nowhere near enough skilled health care workers to meet the sharpy growing demand in the years to come. What can be done?
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
How unaffordable must health care become before the country's political stalemate lets through some legislative solutions?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Health reporters from Politico and The Washington Post joined Urban's Linda Blumberg for a fresh look at the candidates' plans for health reform— and the very real challenges they'd face.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The CDC called to tell local officials that a plane with Americans returning from the center of the coronavirus outbreak was set to land in 11 hours. A doctor leading the response shares what happened next.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
With crucial health insurance protections hanging in the balance, journalists need to be especially rigorous and well-informed on health care policy as the campaigns unfold.

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