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Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or whether Trumpcare will affect the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities. We also explore health care costs and whether Obamacare or its successor plans can live up the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman, David Lansky, executive director of the Pacific Business Group on Health, and independent health journalist Kellie SchmittRyan White, content editor of Center for Health Journalism Digital, serves as the column's principal editor. 

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
A growing group of small and medium-size businesses have signed on to changing how the nation’s health insurance system works. Here's why they're frustrated.
Picture of Ashley Nguyen
“If you don’t have the money to cover a deductible, your insurance in many ways feels like ‘uninsurance’ to you,” said KFF's Larry Levitt during our recent webinar on the soaring costs of job-based plans.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
“The actual debate won’t be about access — it will be about cost containment for all people,” says Harvard's Robert Blendon, a veteran health care pollster.
Picture of Sara Stewart
A long-running dispute between two major health care companies is coming to a head in western Pennsylvania, with consequences for future hospital-versus-insurer showdowns across the country.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
In New York City, where I live, the ads have reached a new level of silliness. You'll hear plenty about CyberKnives and cancer miracles, and nothing about the number of nurses on the night shift.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Reporters file the same stories about bad nursing homes year after year. Little changes. But what if we did more to help families find the right facilities in the first place?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Medicare for All “has changed the dialogue about where we could go as a country,” said Joanne Kenen, Politico's executive health care editor.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Author and physician Sunita Puri talks to journalist Fran Smith about why journalists should be telling these stories — and how they can do so in a more thoughtful way.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Only about 6 percent of medical practitioners have obtained a government waiver that allows them to prescribe a crucial drug for treating opioid addiction. Here's why that's a problem.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
One of the most common arguments against single-payer health systems is that they lead to the rationing of care. Such arguments overlook the rationing baked into the current U.S. system.

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