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Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. It also highlights the ways in which our current system is falling short on measures of coverage, access and affordability. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or how the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities is driving up costs. We also explore health care costs and whether the Affordable Care Act or its successor plans can live up to the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman and independent health journalist Kellie Schmitt, with occasional contributions from independent journalists such as Susan Abram and Sara Stewart.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The California State Assembly recently passed AB 890, which would give “full practice authority” to nurse practitioners. But a California physicians group opposes the bill.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The American College of Physicians is calling for either a single-payer system or a government-run public option. "This is huge!" according to contributor Trudy Lieberman.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Simon Haeder has studied narrow health insurance networks for years, but it wasn’t until the professor's 4-year-old son cracked his tooth that he really appreciated the practical implications.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Having health insurance is no guarantee American families won't suddenly find themselves financially underwater, as reporter Jacob Margolis recently discovered.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
How the media's relentless focus on potential problems and downsides to any more inclusive health system helps preserve the existing arrangement, which seems to profit everyone but patients.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Medicare reporting, once a staple of health care journalism, has largely disappeared from health and political beats. Seniors are paying the price.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
There's an urgent need for better media stories that sort through the proposals and give basic descriptions of what the major plans to lower prices would do.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Special interests have been lobbying hard and working the airwaves to convince consumers that any Congressional efforts to correct the surprise billing problem may actually harm patients.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The Trump administration’s new public charge rule could discourage immigrants from accessing everything from emergency services to free flu shots, health experts warn.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The legislative fight in Ohio that tanked several health care bills is a dark sign of the much fiercer fight to come in Congress over surprise bills and patient protections.

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