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Remaking Health Care

This blog explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or whether Trumpcare will affect the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities. We also explore health care costs and whether Obamacare or its successor plans can live up the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman, David Lansky, executive director of the Pacific Business Group on Health, and independent health journalist Kellie SchmittRyan White, content editor of Center for Health Journalism Digital, serves as the blog's principal editor. 

Picture of Susan  Abram
While California has readily embraced the Affordable Care Act, thousands of uninsured or underinsured still turn out for a mega free clinic in Los Angeles every year. Here are a few of their stories.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Starting treatment for opioid addiction in the hospital may seem obvious, yet it often doesn't happen. A growing program is trying to change that.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
“How are we as consumers supposed to negotiate with this giant entity over a bill?” asks one critic of recent media coverage.
Picture of Susan  Abram
Will California keep pursuing incremental health reforms or make a push for single-payer?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The Miami Herald's Daniel Chang and Politico's Victoria Colliver share their routines, sourcing strategies and other tips for covering the fast-moving health policy beat.
Picture of Judith Solomon
Many people who should remain eligible for Medicaid — because they’re working or qualify for an exemption — will also lose coverage, says CBPP's Judith Solomon.
Picture of Martha Bebinger
The state is way ahead of the pack when it comes to publicly reporting the experiences of Medicaid patients.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
“There’s real hope that help is on the way,” health workforce researcher Edward Salsberg said.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Stories of absurd bills have been great for boosting awareness, but the next batch needs to take a harder look at the politics halting change, writes Trudy Lieberman.
Picture of Michelle Levander
Californians remain without a scorecard to track the performance of Medicaid provider groups, and state officials don't seem eager to change that.

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If you're a journalist with big ideas who wants your work to matter, the Center for Health Journalism invites you to apply for the all-expenses-paid National Fellowship -- five days of stimulating discussions in Los Angeles about social and health safety net issues, plus reporting and engagement grants of $2,000-$12,000 and six months of expert mentoring.

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