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Remaking Health Care

This blog explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or whether Trumpcare will affect the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities. We also explore health care costs and whether Obamacare or its successor plans can live up the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman, David Lansky, executive director of the Pacific Business Group on Health, and independent health journalist Kellie SchmittRyan White, content editor of Center for Health Journalism Digital, serves as the blog's principal editor. 

Picture of John Baackes
Proponents of Medicaid work requirements think it would flush freeloaders out of the system. And yet the reality is that most people on Medicaid already work.
Picture of Susan Salka
Growth in health care employment will fluctuate but the long-range trend is decidedly upward, as these seven signs suggest.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
While ACA repeal efforts have stalled, the individual mandate is gone and Medicaid work requirements are proliferating. Two expert observers weigh in on states' growing role in shaping health policy.
Picture of Leoneda Inge
One of the busiest free clinics in the state of North Carolina closed its doors in 2016. A reporter decided to find out what that meant for the health of the county's disproportionately poor residents.
Picture of Tracie Potts
Susan Moore has colon cancer. She couldn’t afford transportation to dialysis three times a week. Until recently, she wanted to die. Her story struck reporter Tracie Potts especially hard.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
After the state expanded Medicaid under the ACA, Washington state health officials noticed that people who were focused on survival were letting their health needs fall by the wayside.
Picture of Rusha Modi
"The reality is that many medical students, residents and trainee physicians are illiterate in the basics of public health and health policy," says Dr. Rusha Modi.
Picture of Erika Klein
 On Jan. 1, Californians in the state's Medicaid dental program will once again have full dental coverage. But the program's low rates mean many dentists won't see them.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The use of crowdfunding to cover medical costs has grown rapidly in recent years. The trend provides insights into gaps in health coverage, but also poses some problems health reporters should keep in mind.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Experts increasingly point to the high cost of care in America — not necessarily the overuse of care — as the chronic illness of the U.S. system. Here's one model for reporting on the story in your local market.

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