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Remaking Health Care

This blog explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or whether Trumpcare will affect the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities. We also explore health care costs and whether Obamacare or its successor plans can live up the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman, David Lansky, executive director of the Pacific Business Group on Health, and independent health journalist Kellie SchmittRyan White, content editor of Center for Health Journalism Digital, serves as the blog's principal editor. 

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
There's been little serious talk about how to bend the health care cost curve in the GOP health reform debate. That means administrative costs and costly coding wars continue to fly under the radar.
Picture of David Lansky
As drug manufacturers launch a $100 million campaign in a bid to shift the blame over soaring drug prices, how might reporters best cover this urgent issue?
Picture of Michael Lujan
History offers us some basic lessons on how well high-risk pools work for insuring sicker enrollees, with preexisting conditions. Their track record is hardly encouraging.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The only way to insure everyone at a reasonable cost is to make sure everyone — healthy and sick — is in the risk pool together. The House GOP plan won't achieve that goal.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
States such as Kentucky and Arizona are seeking to change how their Medicaid programs work through new policies that include work requirements, enrollment lockouts and increased cost sharing.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The historic defeat sent a signal to politicians that everyone needs health coverage, comprehensive benefits, and sick people can’t be left out.
Picture of Jeffrey McCombs
In Bakersfield, Calif., researchers found 30-day readmission rates dropped significantly when pharmacists where given a larger role in caring for patients.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Why not allow Medicare to negotiate lower prescription drug prices? Economists such as Neeraj Sood worry such a move would hamper crucial innovations over time. But not everyone agrees.
Picture of Mario Molina
"Our health care system remains in a crisis," writes the CEO of Molina Healthcare. "Both the AHCA and the ACA only address the funding of health care and fail to tackle the troubling rate at which health care costs are rising."
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The media critic in Jost laments that "so much coverage is focused on politics within the Republican Party, to a much greater extent than on what the legislation would specifically do."

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