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Slow Medicine

“Slow Medicine” refers to a thoughtful, evidence-based approach to care and emphasizes careful clinical reasoning. It draws on many of the principles of the broader "Slow Movement,” which have been applied to a wide range of fields including food, art, parenting and technology. In this column, authors Dr. Michael Hochman and Dr. Pieter Cohen discuss a wide variety of medical and health care issues in an informal manner, writing as if everyone on the list will be joining them in clinic later in the afternoon. To read more and sign-up for the Slow Medicine newsletter, visit slowmedupdates.com.

Picture of Michael  Hochman
A rigorous new study finds the "hotspotting" approach to health care super-users doesn't work as well as hoped. It's another case of hype outpacing the evidence.
Picture of Pieter Cohen
Those of us who think that generic drugs are interchangeable with brand-name medications because the FDA requires them to be are in for an unpleasant surprise.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
Why employers should stop wasting precious resources on ineffective health screenings and employee lifestyle programs.
Picture of Christopher Hendel
Lisa Schwartz was "one of evidence-based medicine’s greatest thinkers and communicators of the last two decades," writes longtime friend and collaborator Chris Hendel.
Picture of Judith Garber
A recent CNN story about an insurer denying coverage for proton beam therapy is a classic case of the media hyping an unproven, costly treatment.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
Victoria Sweet’s new book offers a personal take on where modern medicine went wrong, and suggests that corporate restraints stand in the way of a more thoughtful approach to care.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
A new study finds less than 20 percent of physicians' electronic notes were made up meaningful text. The remainder — mostly auto-filled "junk" text — does nothing to help doctors understand what's going on with patients.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
U.S. spending on health care alone is large enough to make it the world's fifth largest economy. A more thoughtful, evidence-driven approach to delivering care could curb such staggering statistics.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
When it comes to vaccines, the ongoing struggle against unsubstantiated fringe theories can eclipse other valid concerns about the frequency and type of vaccines doctors prescribe.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
Hospitals can be dangerous, uncomfortable places. As two recent pieces in high-profile medical journals detail, the "hospital-at-home" approach can offer a better alternative for many patients.

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