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Slow Medicine

“Slow Medicine” refers to a thoughtful, evidence-based approach to care and emphasizes careful clinical reasoning. It draws on many of the principles of the broader "Slow Movement,” which have been applied to a wide range of fields including food, art, parenting and technology. In this blog, authors Dr. Michael Hochman and Dr. Pieter Cohen discuss a wide variety of medical and health care issues in an informal manner, writing as if everyone on the list will be joining them in clinic later in the afternoon. To read more and sign-up for the Slow Medicine newsletter, visit slowmedupdates.com.

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U.S. spending on health care alone is large enough to make it the world's fifth largest economy. A more thoughtful, evidence-driven approach to delivering care could curb such staggering statistics.
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When it comes to vaccines, the ongoing struggle against unsubstantiated fringe theories can eclipse other valid concerns about the frequency and type of vaccines doctors prescribe.
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Hospitals can be dangerous, uncomfortable places. As two recent pieces in high-profile medical journals detail, the "hospital-at-home" approach can offer a better alternative for many patients.
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New models in Britain and the U.S. take a larger view of the forces that shape people’s health. That’s because sometimes a patient needs an air conditioner more than a hospital bed.
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Will a diagnosis of “prediabetes” motivate meaningful lifestyle changes among patients, or simply lead patients and providers to use medications rather than refocus on aggressive lifestyle changes?
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In order to see whether heart stents actually improved patients' lives, the VA health care system decided to ask them directly, before and after surgery. But does this approach work?
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Two physicians argue that the effort to track health care quality needs to do a better job of measuring the misuse and overuse of health care services.

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This month, early results from one of the key efforts to transform primary care were published, and the results were underwhelming. But here's what we can learn from the initiative.

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Do patient satisfaction scores encourage doctors to deliver better care — or do they lure them into gaming the system? A recent study looked at the link between patient experiences and health care outcomes.

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Medicare recently announced it is likely to cover a diabetes prevention program that has been shown to be highly effective. Our Slow Medicine team explains why that’s exciting news for pre-diabetic patients.

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