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Slow Medicine

“Slow Medicine” refers to a thoughtful, evidence-based approach to care and emphasizes careful clinical reasoning. It draws on many of the principles of the broader "Slow Movement,” which have been applied to a wide range of fields including food, art, parenting and technology. In this column, authors Dr. Michael Hochman and Dr. Pieter Cohen discuss a wide variety of topical medical and health care issues in an informal manner. 

Picture of Michael  Hochman
Hospitals can be dangerous, uncomfortable places. As two recent pieces in high-profile medical journals detail, the "hospital-at-home" approach can offer a better alternative for many patients.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
New models in Britain and the U.S. take a larger view of the forces that shape people’s health. That’s because sometimes a patient needs an air conditioner more than a hospital bed.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
Will a diagnosis of “prediabetes” motivate meaningful lifestyle changes among patients, or simply lead patients and providers to use medications rather than refocus on aggressive lifestyle changes?
Picture of Michael  Hochman
In order to see whether heart stents actually improved patients' lives, the VA health care system decided to ask them directly, before and after surgery. But does this approach work?
Picture of Michael  Hochman

Two physicians argue that the effort to track health care quality needs to do a better job of measuring the misuse and overuse of health care services.

Picture of Michael  Hochman

This month, early results from one of the key efforts to transform primary care were published, and the results were underwhelming. But here's what we can learn from the initiative.

Picture of Michael  Hochman

Do patient satisfaction scores encourage doctors to deliver better care — or do they lure them into gaming the system? A recent study looked at the link between patient experiences and health care outcomes.

Picture of Michael  Hochman

Medicare recently announced it is likely to cover a diabetes prevention program that has been shown to be highly effective. Our Slow Medicine team explains why that’s exciting news for pre-diabetic patients.

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Citing recent research, our Slow Medicine bloggers write that "we are still exposing far too many patients to an intensity of care at the end of life that leaves their family members with additional grief and regret."

Picture of Michael  Hochman

A study looking at births in Britain finds home-births safer, while another U.S. study finds babies born at home face higher risk of death. It turns out having ways to get moms to the hospital quickly when complications arise might be the most important variable.

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