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Center for Health Journalism Member Blog

The Center for Health Journalism invites journalists, policy thinkers and medical professionals to share their perspectives with our diverse and interdisciplinary community. Our member blog captures a range of perspectives on health, health policy and health journalism. Interested in blogging? Reach out to editor@centerforhealthjournalism.org.

Picture of Michael Hill
"Ashanti Jones’ story was so overwhelming it made me cry during the interview — a first in my four-decade career," writes broadcast reporter Michael Hill.
Picture of Judith Mernit
"You can’t just waltz into a community of people who are marginalized and under threat, stick a microphone in their faces and start asking them questions," writes reporter Judith Mernit, a 2018 Impact Fund recipient.
Picture of Sean Hamill
Jodi Cohen had never heard of researcher Dr. Mani Pavuluri before she got a tip in January 2018 to look into her work. What she found was deeply troubling.
Picture of Barrington Salmon
My original premise was to look to see what if any negative effects gentrification had or has had on the lives, health, well-being and prospects of displaced residents in Washington, D.C.
By jesikah maria ross and Olivia Henry
A nuts-and-bolts account of how community engagement made a crucial difference in telling the stories behind one California county's alarmingly high suicide rate.
Picture of Neha Shastry
CNN reporter Neha Shastry set out to cover the complexities and nuances of America's abortion debate. She ran into roadblocks, reluctant editors and lots of contested facts.
Picture of Diana Mason
A recent review of health news found that nurses were cited as sources in only 2 percent of stories. Why is that? Journalists offered a few common explanations.
Picture of Edgar Avila
What happens when a poorer, unincorporated section of Sonoma is annexed by a wealthier neighboring city? Two editors share what they learned from telling stories of how annexation is impacting a community's health.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
"The biggest thing I learned about people who were reluctant to talk: Emotion affects how people talk about their health, so hearing what they have to say in person matters a great deal."
Picture of LaGloria Wheatfall
An inaccurate census would deprive vulnerable communities of vital public and private resources, writes civil rights advocate LaGloria Wheatfall.

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