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Center for Health Journalism Member Blog

The Center for Health Journalism invites journalists, policy thinkers and medical professionals to share their perspectives with our diverse and interdisciplinary community. Our member blog captures a range of perspectives on health, health policy and health journalism. Interested in blogging? Reach out to editor@centerforhealthjournalism.org.

Picture of Alison Young

This site is my personal portfolio of articles and tips for doing watchdog reporting. www.alisonyoungreports.com

Picture of Dave Davis

Our children shouldn’t live this way.

They shouldn’t have to play at contaminated abandoned industrial sites because their neighborhoods have no green space. They shouldn’t be at risk of dying before their first birthday because the color or their skin makes getting health care difficult. They shouldn’t go to schools where there is no learning and where their parents’ greatest hope is that they don’t join a gang or get attacked.

Picture of Eduardo A. de Oliveira

Chemical remains pose health hazards to fish, migrant fishermenFor decades the Nyanza Color & Chemical plant manufactured dye and textile chemicals in Ashland, Massachusetts. The site was settled in a populated area and was first identified as a hazard in 1971, when pollution was found in the nearby Sudbury River, once considered as a potential source of drinking water for the Boston area. In 1982 the site was put on the Superfund National Priority List and shut down. Over 45,000 tons of chemical sludge had been generated by the waste water treatment processes.

Picture of Robert Joiner

I write about health issues for the St. Louis Beacon. My challenge is to convince diverse groups to engage in constructive dialogue about tackling health care access, disparities and costs.I'm sure we all are wrestling with variations of this challenge. The biggest problem, as I see it, is that t

Picture of William Scanlon

My National Health Journalism Fellowship project involves exploring whether an approach taken by Grand Junction, western Colorado's largest city, could work elsewhere and possibly be a model for low-cost, high-quality near-universal health care, at least until something significant is done at the federal level.

Picture of Stephanie Innes

I'm looking forward to going to Los Angeles Oct. 4!

Working with my colleague, Mariana Alvarado, I'll be reporting on a project about the link between obesity and poverty in children. The Tucson area has a higher-than-average rate of poverty, which disproportionately affects ethnic minorities. Obesity is widespread in those populations and is particularly rampant among Hispanics and American Indians, who are developing type 2 diabetes at increasingly young ages.

Picture of Shawn  Doherty

Through three separate stories I will delve into some of Wisconsin's most poignant health disparities, including infant mortality rates that are worse than those in some third-world countries, one Madison African-American community's grassroots campaign to combat smoking through photodocumentation and support groups, and the lack of health care faced by many Latino dairy workers, who now help prop up the state's farming industry.

Picture of Viji Sundaram

The yearning for a male child in some Asian cultures -- Indian, Korean and Chinese in particular – runs deep. A male child is perceived as someone who will be a breadwinner when he grows up and take care of his parents in their old age, someone who will also continue the family line. In India, a girl child is viewed as a net loss to the family, mostly because when she is given away in marriage, she is expected to bring with her a dowry, a practice that still persists, despite the fact that it was banned in that country many years ago.

Picture of Laura Starecheski

Recently, at a meeting of social workers serving African immigrants, I brought up the issue of mental health. “We don’t have a problem with mental illness in the African community,” a caseworker told me, citing the resilience of a population largely familiar with extreme poverty, human rights abuses, and instability.

Picture of Peter Korn

A little known Oregon law requires hospitals to provide written notification of serious adverse events to all victims (or families of victims). The law is largely ignored; last year 40 such written notifications were recorded, though national studies of medical errors predict there likely were over 1,000 such events at Oregon hospitals.

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