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Here’s what we’re checking out today:

Radiation Worries: As if you didn’t have enough to worry about with all the controversy over whole-body airport security scanners, the New York Times’ Walt Bogdanich and Jo Craven McGinty examine possible radiation risks for children and teens in the wake of lucrative dental diagnostic technologies both old and new.

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Today's Daily Briefing travels to Chinese mental institutions, California prisons, and all over the map with bogus trend stories.

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Ethan Watters is the author of “Crazy Like Us: The Globalization of the American Psyche,” an examination of the cultural underpinnings of mental illness. A frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine, Discover, Men’s Journal, Details, Wired and PRI's “This American Life,” he also has appeared on “Good Morning America,” “Talk of the Nation,” CNN and “The Daily Show.” His work has been featured in “The Best American Science and Nature Writing” book series.

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Get your week rolling with these tidbits from around the web:

Live Now: Forbes' Matthew Herper is blogging the Food and Drug Administration’s Avandia review in real time.

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Whether you’re facing hourly, daily or monthly deadlines, it’s nice to get some inspiration from some excellent health journalists and the people who edit them.

For that inspiration, I turned off my laptop and opened an actual book: The New York Times Reader: Health and Medicine (CQ Press, 2010). This recently-published paperback, an annotated anthology of work by the New York Times’ health and medical writers, is aimed at journalism students, but professionals at all levels can learn from it too.

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Have you ever gone in for an oil change and left with the suspicion that the mechanics didn’t do anything beyond opening your hood?

Anemona Hartocollis at The New York Times has exposed this same type of behavior in a much more critical venue: a local hospital. She wrote:

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I'm a physician.  As such, the information I work with has immediate consequences.  I have to get it right every time.  Of course, no one can really get it right every time, but if you want to report health information, you have to try very, very hard.  According to a Pew survey released last fall, over 60% of Americans seek out and act on health information online.  When you put a story out there, people are going to read it and act on it, so you are, in essence, giving health advice without the benefit of a license to practice medicine.

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In October, Antidote reported that Dr. John Eden, a well-respected Australian hormone researcher and the founder and director of the Sydney Menopause Centre, had second thoughts about his participation in a review article about hormone replacement therapy (HRT) that was written with the help of pharmaceutical giant Wyeth.

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What does it take for a doctor to lose his license in Arkansas?

Dr. Randeep Singh Mann appears to have pushed the envelope just about as far as it can go, and he is still holding an active medical license from that state.

Mann, an internist in Russellville, is accused of attacking the head of the Arkansas State Medical Board by planting a bomb in his driveway.

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Charles M. Blow documents that President Obama's sales job for the health care reform law has so far resulted in his lowest approval ratings on health care (34%) since taking office. Blow writes that: "This underscores the current fight for the soul of this country. It's not just a tug of war between left and right. It's a struggle between the mind and the heart, between evidence and emotions, between reason and anger, between what we know and what we believe."

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