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abuse

Picture of Debra Varnado
Four years after the city of Los Angeles expanded its domestic abuse response team program to all 21 divisions in the Los Angeles Police Department, a report says the program falls short of its target due to low levels of implementation by patrol officers.
Picture of Jason Kandel
In one incident, a girl with a mental health diagnosis was pepper-sprayed in the groin, then left to use toilet water to relieve her pain.
Picture of Amanda Curcio
The White River Regional Juvenile Detention Center will stop incarcerating kids by this summer.
Picture of Debra Varnado
Public health officials and medical professionals now recognize violence and other major factors — education, employment status, income, experience with discrimination — as key factors for women’s health.
Picture of Molly Sullivan
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Molly Sullivan, a participant in the 2018 California Fellowship. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Molly Sullivan
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Molly Sullivan, a participant in the 2018 California Fellowship. Other stories in this series include: Domestic violence resource centers boost efforts in south Sacramento neighborhoods
Picture of Mabinty Quarshie
Witnessing abuse carries the same risk of harm to children's mental health and learning as if the children had been abused directly, new research shows.
Picture of Jonetta Barras
District officials in Washington, D.C. are working on creating trauma-informed schools. But how effective has the effort been at reducing excessive absences and failing grades?
Picture of Jayne O'Donnell
Exposure to domestic abuse can change how children view relationships, with effects that last a lifetime.
Picture of Richard Webster
Traumatized children often have difficulties with anger management, impulse control and the processing and retention of information.

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