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Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
The allegations were straight out of Oliver Twist: Teens said there were maggots in the food — and barely enough of it. Officers choked and punched them. For discipline and diversion, workers organized fights among the detainees.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
The boys had just returned to Module 9 of the Miami juvenile lockup from the dining hall when one of them hit Elord Revolte high and hard.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
This article and others in this series were produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
Spurred by the death of 17-year-old Elord Revolte after a fight in a Miami-Dade County juvenile lockup, the Miami Herald undertook an exhaustive investigation into the state’s deeply troubled juvenile justice system.
Picture of Harold Pierce
So much of Luton’s childhood and adolescence seemed normal to her at the time. Her father mishandling her mother. Her brother coming after her with a metal poker. Her boyfriend with the meth addiction. All normal. It’s a wonder how she didn’t become a statistic herself.
Picture of Bryana Kappa
How one young child learned to cope with some early traumatic experiences and tell his story in a new way, through child-parent therapy.
Picture of Leoneda Inge
A group of reporters visits L.A.’s Homeboy Industries and learns what second chances mean for young survivors of gang life.
Picture of Harold Pierce
In some of Kern County’s poorest, majority-white communities, people are dying four to 17 years before those in other parts of Bakersfield, Calif. Life expectancies are on par with less-developed countries like Iraq and Kazakhstan.
Picture of Timothy  Pratt
In Georgia, thousands of students are taken out of their schools and sent to centers where they are supposed to receive an education and therapeutic treatment for behaviors linked to their disabilities.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
For former foster children, the ACA's expansion of Medicaid coverage has made it easier to get care from their often complex health needs. Now some worry the expansion could be undone.

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