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Picture of Anna Challet
Childhood trauma and adversity have been big buzz phrases in recent years. But are they really just proxy terms for poverty? How one journalist came to rethink her own assumptions in reporting on mental health.
Picture of Ryan White
A new analysis of national data reveals for the first time just a slew of disparities between the mental and physical health of children placed in foster care and otherwise similar kids.
Picture of Anna Challet
“Perhaps the biggest deficit in our clients’ lives is a lack of two things – it’s a lack of community and it’s a lack of self-esteem,” says Rob Gitin, who works with vulnerable youth in San Francisco.
Picture of Lane Anderson

Anthony Marcus had heard the same story about underage sex workers that most of us know — that they are brutalized by violent pimps and sold into sex slavery. But is that story correct?

Picture of Virginia Lynne Anderson

A look at what happens to children who've lost parents to death, mental illness, addiction and other causes yielded some notable lessons for one reporter.

Picture of Emily  Cureton

In rural California, the state says the solutions to domestic violence require a cultural shift, that entire communities must take responsibility for ending violence against women. Now, new programs on the ancestral lands of the Yurok Tribe are trying to do that.

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Domestic violence breeds shame and fear, which often keeps the abused from seeking help. Shame and fear also feed family and social dysfunction, and violence can become a normal part of life, a curse that gets passed down from generation to generation.

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Tracking domestic violence is difficult; more so in rural areas. But in California’s Del Norte County, these calls come into law enforcement agencies at a rate two-and-a-half times that of anywhere else in the state.

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Emily Cureton’s reporting was undertaken as a California Health Journalism Fellow at the University of Southern California's Center for Health Journalism. ...

Picture of Anna Challet

In California, kids and young adults in need of mental health care are getting lost in the system. Advocates say many families are stuck on waiting lists, while other youths end up in the juvenile justice system after their families run out of options that don’t involve law enforcement.

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