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addiction

Picture of Teresa Sforza
Over the decade from 2008 to 2017, as the opioid epidemic took hold, the number of drug-exposed infants born per year nearly tripled in California
Picture of Teresa Sforza
When the "crack baby epidemic" of the 1980s and '90s was raging, many experts offered stark, long-term forecasts. While those were overblown, there still is cause for concern. This series was produced with the support of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism Impact Fund.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Starting treatment for opioid addiction in the hospital may seem obvious, yet it often doesn't happen. A growing program is trying to change that.
Picture of Martha Escudero
Mothers who have experienced trauma and live stressful lives often make bad choices. Gabriela's story is a heartbreaking example.
Picture of Amy Linn
Up to a third of people in Navajo Nation today lack heating, plumbing, or fully equipped kitchens. Indoor toilets are a luxury. Roads are terrible. How have these people been forgotten for so long?
Picture of Luanne Rife
In Appalachia, a legacy hospital system is failing to keep people well and remain solvent. Can a new modernized health system take its place?
Picture of Momo Chang
“Children get the best care possible, no doubt,” says the head of the Sickle Disease Foundation of California. “It’s when that child becomes an adult — that’s when they fall into a black hole.”
Picture of Cary Aspinwall
We're asking distinguished reporters to highlight an issue or story that is either being missed entirely or underreported by the media.
Picture of Jill Replogle
It was a vexing data riddle: Were opioids leading seniors to commit suicide? Or did they have major health problems that led them to take their lives?

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