Skip to main content.

Affordable Care Act

Picture of Jason Kane

In Arkansas, an alternative to the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion uses federal dollars to purchase private health plans for low-income residents who fall in a coverage gap. But now, as other states consider following suit, the Arkansas law, could end unless it is renewed by lawmakers.

Picture of Momo Chang

The fellowship project is looking at outreach to, and enrollment of, limited English speakers in Covered California, our state's version of the Affordable Care Act.

Picture of Evan George

Heroin addiction grabbed the national spotlight recently after famed actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died on Super Bowl Sunday. He was almost certainly not alone that day — about 100 Americans die every day from drug overdoses. Can anything be done to stop this?

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

The data on the much-lauded Patient Centered Medical Home approach, a cornerstone of ACA, shows that it is expensive, onerously bureaucratic, a drain on health care resources, especially for primary care providers, and a distraction from health care delivery.

Picture of Ryan White

S.F. health officials say their focus is now on retaining and attracting new Medi-Cal patients. The challenge gives fresh urgency to efforts to improve customer service, lower appointment wait times and boost efficiency.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Underwhelming results demonstrate that after all the money and effort invested in bureaucracy, Patient Centered Medical Homes do not contribute to actual patient care.

Picture of Ted B. Kissell

In California, the effort to get people signed up for insurance has proceeded with little partisan rancor, and at a quickening pace. December enrollment was nearly four times that of October and November combined. Nonetheless, millions of Californians remain uninsured.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Patient-Centered Primary Care Medical Homes have been around for decades. The more you know about the intention behind them, the more you wonder, "How could that not be a good idea?" Based on the research, cost of implementation and effect on patient care, the answer I found may surprise you.

Picture of Eric Whitney

GOP leaders say opposition to Obamacare is their No. 1 campaign issue for the midterm election. At the same time, a growing number of Republican states now embrace a major provision of the law — expanding Medicaid, government-funded health benefits for the poor.

Picture of Eric Whitney

The White House has set aside more than a quarter of a billion dollars nationally to pay navigators who can give people face-to-face help — in buying coverage and in calculating subsidies to make it more affordable. Colorado has almost $24 per person to spend on outreach.

Pages

Announcements

How can students head back to school in the fall without triggering new waves of sick families, teachers and staff? In this webinar, we’ll take a deeper look at what’s at stake for student learning and wellness as the pandemic continues. Sign-up here!

The Center for Health Journalism is dedicated to supporting journalists covering two of the biggest stories of our time — the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and inequities in America. We provide reporters with intensive training instituteswebinars and tips about craft and content and are providing deep and sustained support for reporters and their newsrooms in this historic and difficult moment. You can donate through the USC web portal at this link. Pressed for time? You can also text to donate! No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth