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Affordable Care Act

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GlaxoSmithKline, the largest drug company in Britain and one of the largest in the world, has made an industry first move.

Picture of Eric Whitney

Florida politicians erected roadblocks to the ACA from the beginning — from joining in the 2010 lawsuit to thwart the law to placing restrictions on what insurance helpers called navigators can tell people seeking advice. Even so, advocates have been trying to get the word out.

Picture of Sandra Hausman

As prison populations continue to increase and budgets get tighter, reforming the system will become ever more important.

Picture of Jennifer Haberkorn

April Gomez-Rodriguez hopes Obamacare changes her life. Daniel Hughes says it’s like the health law never happened. The difference between them: one state border.

Picture of Giana  Magnoli

Two reporters who just spent six months covering the local impacts of the Affordable Care Act in Santa Barbara County reflect on their experience and lessons learned. They tell a story of health care providers struggling to provide quality care in the midst of much uncertainty.

Picture of Laurie Tarkan

Here's a post I edited for my blog, WellBeeFile, addressing a question I hadn't seen this asked in the media: how will the Affordable Care Act affect divorced women, who often struggle financially? I ran the question by Washington State social and health researcher Bridget Lavelle.

Picture of Jill  Braden Balderas

As the Health Insurance Marketplace launched Tuesday, the news media focused on computer glitches and long wait times.  But there’s one population that didn’t have the opportunity to join the fray – those wanting to sign up in Spanish.

Picture of Jill  Braden Balderas

Our all-star panel, including Sarah Kliff of the Washington Post and Peggy Girshman of Kaiser Health News, discuss via webcast key issues journalists need to know about covering the Affordable Care Act implementation.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

While government officials say signing up for health insurance will be like buying an airline ticket online, it won’t be. Clicking your way to Paris is a lot easier and much more fun than understanding coinsurance from Blue Cross.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

The average man or woman on the street who needs insurance doesn’t care one whit what policy wonks and partisan bloggers have to say about premium costs. They will decide to buy or not buy based on their pocketbooks, a point overlooked in the media rush to report the spin.

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