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aging

Picture of Nicole Karlis
From extreme loneliness to heart problems to vision impairment, how does living without a home affect or contribute to these conditions as a person ages?
Picture of Laura Wenus
Stories of abuse or serious neglect in nursing homes make headlines, but patients and consumer advocates are trying to bring attention to overarching issues and push for a better system.
Picture of Laura Wenus
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Laura Wenus, a participant in the 2019 California Fellowship, a program of USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism. Other stories in this series include: Nursing Care Expected To Worsen As California Ages Nursing Care Crunch Puts The On
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Reporters file the same stories about bad nursing homes year after year. Little changes. But what if we did more to help families find the right facilities in the first place?
Picture of Julia Sclafani
In Orange County, older adults die of Alzheimer’s disease at a higher rate than their peers in most of the country — it’s the third leading cause of death for the group, compared to the sixth nationwide.
Picture of Emily Underwood
There’s strong evidence that palliative care can improve the quality of life for terminal and chronically ill patients, while reducing emergency room visits and hospitalizations by as much as half.
Picture of Vicki Gonzalez
Reporter Vicki Gonzalez spent the past year on this series as a recipient of the 2018 California Fellowship with USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.  
Picture of Pam Marino
"Only until people really realize there are 70 – and 80-year-old women living in their cars will we as a society be forced to change,” one local nonprofit leader says.
Picture of Andrew Lam
The cost of aging in America is outrageous, as journalist Andrew Lam's family has come to learn. And the costs aren't just financial — caring for aging family members requires tremendous human capital as well.
Picture of Molly Sullivan
California is facing a gray tide. And the state’s fragile long-term care infrastructure is ill-prepared for the coming surge in demand. What can be done?

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