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AIDS denialism

Picture of James  Kityo

Persons living with HIV gathered in Uganda to discuss a number of issues, including antiretroviral drug adherence, influence of traditional practices, human rights and jobs.

Picture of Michelle Levander

How does knowledge about unfamiliar diseases enter the public consciousness and the public policy agenda?

Picture of Nalea J. Ko

It’s been over six months since I began the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, and now here I am writing my final blog.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

Living with HIV or AIDS can be an unyielding source of stress that is not easily handled alone. It takes support, activism and a strong determination to not only survive, but thrive with a disease that takes a heavy mental, physical and emotional toll.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

When HIV/AIDS was thought of as a White, gay disease, it was often the suffering of Black patients that helped the world realize that it could affect anyone. Today, African-Americans remain the racial group most acutely affected by the epidemic.

Picture of Nalea J. Ko

The Asian Pacific American community includes more than 100 languages/dialects and some 45 different ethnic subgroups, complicating the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

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