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Alameda County

Picture of Sandy Kleffman

Some non-profit hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area receive millions of dollars in tax breaks each year to care for the poor and uninsured, yet they provide only a fraction of local charity care. Sandy Kleffman reports.

Picture of Micky Duxbury

Oakland's superintendent doesn't just want to close schools. He wants to radically alter how the school district and the city educate kids.

Picture of Beatrice Motamedi

It's third period at Castlemont Business and Information Technology School in East Oakland. A visitor begins a discussion about poverty, bad food and crime. Tough times? Tough streets? These high school students aren't stressing.

Picture of Bob Butler

Devaugndre Broussard grew up in three violent neighborhoods: San Francisco's Bayview-Hunter's Point and Western Addition and Richmond's Iron Triangle. His mother went to prison for drug sales when he was only 10 months old. She went back to prison several times while he grew up, sending him to a series of foster homes. A girlfriend who attended some of Broussard's early court appearances told the Chauncey Bailey Project this might've set the tone for his life. He's one of many people she knows who lived in foster homes where "parents" were more interested in the monthly county check than in their foster kids.

Picture of Bob Butler

Matthew Crawford wants to be a police officer. Terrell Williams works two jobs and goes to college. Claude Eakins works as an advocate helping young people in the foster care system. They all have two things in common: they, too, were once in the foster care system and they believe media reports

Picture of Heather May

This story explores how freeways may cause children in certain Utah neighborhoods to be hospitalized more often. It is a sidebar to the third part of her series on health disparities in Salt Lake City.

Picture of Micky Duxbury

Almost 50 years ago, a notorious church bombing in Birmingham, Ala. killed two of Fania Davis's closest friends—and launched Davis, then a teenager, into a lifetime of social justice work. Today, the well-known Oakland resident directs Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth (RJOY), an innovative organization that aims to turn teenagers accused of crimes or troublemaking into responsible citizens.

Picture of Michelle Levander

The Internet and social media have a way of upending professional conventions and giving rise to new models.  As traditional boundaries blur, some unique collaborations have emerged between cutting-edge journalists and public health practitioners. I’ve been fascinating by some of these projects, which have yielded new insights, ground-breaking stories and new ways of connecting with the public. 

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