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Alzheimer's Association

Picture of Frank Gluck

Reporter Frank Gluck recently spent five months reporting on how Alzheimer’s disease has affected Southwest Florida, where the population of seniors is twice the national average. Here he shares some essential reporting lessons and tips for others tackling the topic in their region.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, is hitting older communities such as Southwest Florida hard, overwhelming retirement savings and loading more costs onto the region's already strained medical system, a five-month News-Press investigation found.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Alzheimer’s disease caregivers, usually elderly spouses or working adult children, face higher risk of physical and mental health problems such as anxiety, depression and heart problems. Stressed caregivers are 63 percent more likely to die within four years compared to non-caregivers.

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After three days of listening to expert neurologists, demographers, caregivers, and policy people on Alzheimer's disease, journalist Laura Newman raises tough questions for journalists to consider to avoid oversimplifying this complicated topic.

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The Alzheimer's Association estimated in 2009 that as many as 5.3 million Americans suffer from the mind-robbing illness. With that number expected to grow by double-digit percentages through 2025 as the population ages, scientists are working feverishly on strategies for prevention and treatment. But more than 100 years after the disease was discovered, it's still not clear what causes it. The only approved treatments barely dull the symptoms.

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The COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in soaring levels of food insecurity and unmet needs in families across the nation. In our next webinar, we’ll explore fresh angles for deeper reporting on vulnerable families in your community. Sign-up here!

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