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Alzheimer's disease

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In Orange County, older adults die of Alzheimer’s disease at a higher rate than their peers in most of the country — it’s the third leading cause of death for the group, compared to the sixth nationwide.
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Reporter Frank Gluck recently spent five months reporting on how Alzheimer’s disease has affected Southwest Florida, where the population of seniors is twice the national average. Here he shares some essential reporting lessons and tips for others tackling the topic in their region.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, is hitting older communities such as Southwest Florida hard, overwhelming retirement savings and loading more costs onto the region's already strained medical system, a five-month News-Press investigation found.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Experts estimate that as many as 55,000 Southwest Floridians have diagnosed or undiagnosed Alzheimer's disease. To better understand the disease's impact on the region, The News-Press in Fort Myers, Florida, interviewed experts on the disease and families now coping with it.

Picture of Susan Gilbert

A death notice in The New York Times last week caught the eye of one of my colleagues, who circulated it around the office. It was for an emerita professor of psychology at Cornell who committed suicide after receiving an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. Are there more such death notices to come?

Picture of William Heisel

New research suggests Alzheimer's disease is responsible for far more deaths than has been reported. The finding has major implications for health policy and research.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Alzheimer’s disease caregivers, usually elderly spouses or working adult children, face higher risk of physical and mental health problems such as anxiety, depression and heart problems. Stressed caregivers are 63 percent more likely to die within four years compared to non-caregivers.

Picture of Collin Tong

Navigating the challenges of caring for a loved one with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease need not be a solitary journey. It is impossible to surmount the hurdles without reaching out to others.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Researching, writing and submitting papers to medical journals--and reworking and finessing them if accepted--is a demanding, time consuming job which drug companies have made into pay dirt.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Conflicts of interest in genetic counseling, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, TV dangers and more from our Daily Briefing.

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