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A new company aims to clean up the FDA's messy data for reporting drug adverse events and market it to pharma and other businesses. Health reporters can benefit from the company's work, too.

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Why is the FDA'S adverse events drug database in such a shambles? Scientist Keith Hoffman explains — and talks about how his company has found a business opportunity in that messy data.

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In the war against ghostwriting in the medical literature, the rules can only get you so far.

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I'm highlighting "slaps" — lawsuits, threats or other attempts to shut up health journalists or whistleblowers. Has this happened to you or your colleagues? Let me know.

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Kansas City Star reporter Alan Bavley became something of a cause celebre after the feds threatened him with a fine for using public medical malpractice data. I talk with him about his experiences and public reaction to his reporting.

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A pharma insider offers some strict rules for medical researchers to avoid pharma ghostwriting and other conflicts of interest in their work — and help save the reputation of medical science.

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A patient wants a friendly doctor, but not too friendly. So what's a patient to do when her doctor asks her to a football game — or for a loan?

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After Michele Bachmann's ill-advised comments on the cervical cancer vaccine, here are some suggestions for covering vaccines. At the top of the list: stop quoting celebrities.

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Let's stand up publicly to support patient safety and Alan Bavley, the Kansas City Star reporter whose coverage of medical malpractice caused federal health officials to remove a public doctors database and threaten Bavley with fines.

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Kansas City Star reporter Alan Bavley was just doing his job. In response to his watchdog stories on medical malpractice, federal officials yanked public portions of a national doctor database offline and threatened him with fines. Now, journalists are pushing back.

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