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Journalists can learn a lot from Reuters Health's investigation into financial conflicts of interest in medical research. Here are some tips for your own reporting.  

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Texas sheriff Robert Roberts and doctor Rolando Arafiles, accused of intimidating whistleblower nurses, get their day in court - while Arafiles has found another hospital job despite the controversy.

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When a company tries to mimic a well-known and respected brand, health journalists should be suspicious. Consider The Harvard Drug Group. Most people hearing about a pharmaceutical wholesaler with that name might assume that it was affiliated with Harvard University. It's not.

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It can be uncomfortable asking people about their finances. In journalism, though, there is an obligation not only to ask, but to ask for proof — especially with clinical trials.

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"Octomom" Nadya Suleman went to Dr. Michael Kamrava as a troubled patient. She was treated instead by her physician - who lost his license this week - as a customer. And now the media has chosen to treat her as a criminal.

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Every time Public Citizen ranks state medical boards for their effectiveness, some official will say that it is an unfair assessment because state boards all work differently in overseeing doctors. This is partly true — and it is also part of the problem.

 

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One of the biggest oversights a health writer can make is to cover a scientific study and not talk about its funders. William Heisel examines what can happen when a study's funding is overlooked.

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Bioethicist and writer Carl Elliott used many documents to piece together the story of how a research team desperate for patients helped create a pipeline for clinical trial participants by setting up a psychiatric ward. Here's how he did it.

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Before he was busted for prescribing drugs over the Internet, Dr. Stephen Hollis wrote 43,930 prescriptions for drugs in just one year, about about 170 scrips every workday. How is that even possible? Hollis tells me how.

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After being busted for dispensing prescriptions over the Internet and providing poor medical care to his patients, Dr. Stephen Hollis says he still maintains a thriving eye surgery practice. He talks about his past and present in a surprisingly candid interview.

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