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Health care has changed radically in the last decade. Yet we're still using outdated statistics on medical errors. Why?

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Patient activist Helen Haskell argues that we won't be able to prevent medical errors unless we get a better handle on just how many errors there are.

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You don't want to be a disease mongerer, do you? Here's how to avoid it in your work.

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How many times do you see pain patients who aren’t addicted represented in stories about prescription painkillers? Maia Szalavitz weighs in.

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Let's give credit to the folks who are trying to eliminate healthcare-associated infections in hospitals by putting them on the Herd Immunity map.

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Three more questions you should pursue based on the debate over the SorryWorks! program, which protects doctors who apologize for medical errors that harm patients.

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Efforts to change laws to encourage doctors to apologize for medical errors while avoiding lawsuits have sparked debate over whether patient safety will be compromised. Here's why.

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The American Pain Foundation – an industry-funded promoter of painkillers - closed its doors last week amid a federal inquiry. Here's how some top-notch journalists helped make it happen.

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What's an 87-year-old doctor to do when he's banned from performing surgery but still allowed to practice medicine? Prescribe medical marijuana in a dubious clinic.

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An aging doctor has been ordered to pay part of a $6.2 million judgment for negligence in performing two abortions. Why is he still practicing?

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