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If Coca-Cola doesn't market to kids, why are its logos all over city parks and youth sports events? Get tips on how to report on soft-drink makers' deals with local agencies in your community.

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Why did the California Medical Board take so long after Michael Jackson's death to revoke Conrad Murray's medical license? The board's spokesman explains.

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The Medical Board of California finally has filed a petition to revoke Dr. Conrad Murray’s medical license, nearly three years after Michael Jackson died after taking anesthesia drugs Murray gave him. So what took so long?

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The controversy over revisions to psychiatry's bible, the DSM, isn't just about autism. Guest blogger Mary Schweitzer throws chronic fatigue syndrome into the mix.

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Why did Slate retract a critical commentary by bioethicist Carl Elliott on stem cell firm Celltex after a demand by the controversial company's CEO?

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From the way the American Psychiatric Association threatened writer Suzy Chapman, one would think APA is fighting legal battles everywhere to protect its trademarks. But the British mental health blogger appears to be in an elite category.

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Why did the American Psychiatric Association pressure a British mental health blogger to stop publishing her popular blog?

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An ethics scandal at the American Journal of Bioethics is prompting journalists to more closely scrutinize the journals they cover. Here are some tips for evaluating a journal's credibility.

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Even under serious deadline pressure, you can build a solid health story without cribbing from a news release. Here’s my 55-minute solution.

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At their best, news releases are designed to distill complex science into understandable language the public (and media) can understand. At their worst, they are designed to sell a particular product. Here's how to use them as a jumping off point, not a crutch, for your health reporting.

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Got a great idea for a reporting project on the health of underserved communities in California or on the performance of the state's health and social safety nets?  We're offering reporting grants of $2,000 to $10,000, plus six months of mentoring, to up to eight individual journalists, newsrooms or cross-newsroom collaboratives.  Deadline to apply:  September 20.

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