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Atmospheric sciences

Picture of David Danelski

We already knew about air pollution's link to asthma, heart disease, lung cancer, and shorter lives. But few of us have given much thought to its effect on the brain. Research in one of the most polluted places -- Mexico City -- sheds light on what might be happening in Inland Southern California.

Picture of David Danelski

Children in suburban Riverside and San Bernardino counties breathe what is arguably the worst air in America. Diesel soot and other harmful particles and lung-searing ozone build up in the region, not only from local sources but from polluters in coastal areas.

Picture of Kari Lydersen

I figured the air around Chicago rail yards would be dirty...but finding out was not as easy as it seemed.

Picture of Kari Lydersen

We often hear that climate change will have a devastating impact on the world's poor in the future, and that may well be true. But a fraction of the resources spent fighting future climate change could go a long way in global public health efforts right now.

Picture of Linda Marsa

At what point will our planet become too darn hot? Scientists are now saying that if we don't do anything about curbing carbon emissions, temperatures in the next few decades could rise so high so fast that many regions of the Earth will become inhabitable.

Picture of Kari Lydersen

When the Chicago City Council last week passed an ordinance to reduce emissions from construction equipment working on city jobs, it touched on a larger problem: harmful amounts of diesel exhaust in the city. Journalist Kari Lydersen found troubling emission levels in some neighborhoods.

 

Picture of Pascale Fusshoeller

Wildfires are a yearly occurrence in the Sierra Nevada. Low fuel moisture, high temperatures and human impacts in the wildland-urban interface combine into the ideal conditions for fast-moving fires. At the same time, ozone pollution levels regularly approach unhealthy levels. The area itself does not generate the pollution, but prevailing winds push pollution out of the Bay area and Sacramento corridor against the foothills and peaks of the region. U.S. EPA and the American Lung Association have consistently ranked Nevada County among the dozen most ozone-polluted counties in the nation.

Picture of Heather May

This story explores how freeways may cause children in certain Utah neighborhoods to be hospitalized more often. It is a sidebar to the third part of her series on health disparities in Salt Lake City.

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