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Austin

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Last week in Austin, TX was an amazing time at South by Southwest (SXSW). Apart from catching up with colleagues and friends that I don't usually get to see on a regular basis, I just felt more apart of the "what's around the corner" vibe that originally brought me to the event. This was partly due to the fact that I had a great time during my panel session and meeting great people interested in taking innovative concepts from the developing world and making them useful as solutions here in the States (reverse innovation).

Picture of Angilee Shah

On the hunt for the best SXSW panels where health and journalism collide? Angilee Shah shares her picks in Austin.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Even if you were in Austin for South by Southwest last week, the sheer volume of information and number of people make it difficult to know what the ultimate take-aways were. How can you sum up the best tips and critical thinking from some 40 panels and meet-ups and events related to health this

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The Future of Music Coalition conducted a survey in 2010 showing that 33 percent of musicians responding had no health insurance. It's a problem that resonates with freelance journalists or those who do not receive health benefits from their employers. Broader concerns about health access in the

Picture of Angilee Shah

I'll admit it: I am a South by Southwest newbie. But since the megaconference is expecting over 14,000 participants in the Interactive portion alone, I'm going to guess I won't be the only one. But I've done my homework, downloaded the (indispensible) mobile app, and scoured the schedule for new ideas in health. Here are the panels that caught my eye.

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Serious depression is a growing problem for multicultural seniors. But unlike older whites, ethnic people 50-plus are blocked from treatment by poverty, limited or no insurance, lack of programs geared for them—and the stigma of mental problems that permeates many cultures. New America media senior editor Paul Kleyman begins his occasional series on mental challenges for ethnic seniors with this article on treatable depression.

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Although Doctors Behaving Badly tends to focus on exactly what you would expect, its mission is to make people aware of the many ways that patients are left unprotected.

There are nearly 1 million licensed, practicing physicians nationwide. Antidote has no ability to count how many are “behaving badly,” but it is safe to say that only a slim minority are tainting the reputation of the medical community. Doctors who abuse, injure or kill patients are the surrogate markers for an illness in the physician discipline system. They are not the illness.

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Clair Jordan, the executive director of the Texas Nurses Association for the past 30 years, has seen nurses in a lot of difficult situations.

Picture of Jeff  Kelly Lowenstein

This story distills a national analysis of nursing home data and finds that Illinois is the worst state in the country for black seniors seeking nursing home. Illinois has the highest number of poorly rated majority black facilities in the country and just one black nursing home that received an excellent rating from Nursing Home Compare.

We looked at black and white homes where a high percentage of resident care was paid for by Medicaid and found that the disparities between the two groups actually increased, rather than shrunk as some owners with whom we had spoken predicted.

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