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Biology

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Someone at the Washington Post is having a very bad day today. As Gawker reports, a health story went live on the newspaper’s website with all of the editor’s comments in it. The story was quickly pulled down, but Gawker helpfully pasted the entire story on its site beforehand.

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Why is the controversial pesticide methyl iodide set to be used in California strawberry fields? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Utah County's blogging "asthma mom" offers tips to help people avoid attack triggers. It is a sidebar to the third part of May's series on health disparities in Salt Lake City.

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Here’s the latest in health and health journalism news from Reporting on Health.


Sick Leave:

Could San Francisco’s nationally recognized paid sick leave law extend to the rest of California? Mari Edlin writes about one state lawmaker’s proposal for California Healthline.

Picture of William Heisel

Health reporters got an unusual amount of mileage out of a study that said that its chief finding was “of unknown clinical significance.” And when these same reporters put on their blogging hats, they went off-road entirely.

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Why do two Central California cities top a new "most toxic" cities list? Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Francine Kaufman, M.D.

Today I lectured at the medical school. It is on a hill in a UNICEF tent. It was over 100 degrees in the "test classroom" while I was lecturing. The students took handwritten notes and copied down every word I said.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

In July, I wrote about a “jaw-dropping” press release about California’s astonishing rise in whooping cough cases.

Picture of Sarah Arnquist

While speaking at the National Institutes of Health on Tuesday, USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah (left, photo source USAID) told the audience of scientists how the development agency would support the creation of new innovations and their delivery to improve the health of the world’s neediest popul

Picture of Christina Elston

What is air pollution doing to our kids? If you live in L.A. County, and especially if you’ve driven back to the Los Angeles basin from somewhere else, you’ve seen it. A steely brown haze hangs over us for much of the year. We live in the smoggiest region in the United States (according to the South Coast Air Quality Management District), but for those raising children here it may not be top of mind. In some parts of the county, moms claw their way onto waiting lists for the “right” preschool while they are still pregnant. Concerns about finding the right neighborhood, the right school, about keeping kids away from gangs and drugs or getting them to turn off the Xbox and do some homework tend to take center stage. The air we breathe gets plenty of media coverage, but we tend to consider it more of an inconvenience than an emergency.

Yet at every stage of children’s lives – from their time in the womb until they’re ready to leave the nest – the pollution in the air impacts their health. 2010 California Health Journalism Fellow Christina Elston reports.

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