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Picture of Patty  Machelor
Since the Great Recession, Arizona has cut programs that help poor families and spent more money on foster care and adoption services. The results have been tragic.
Picture of Keren Landman
Teenage pregnancy isn't typically thought of as a problem for sexual minorities — yet their risk of pregnancy is often higher. The possible explanations are complicated.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
Mackenzie Mays is a reporter for the Fresno Bee. Her series on teen pregnancy and sex education was done as a fellow with the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism....
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
Out of 160 Fresno Unified high school students who took a survey conducted by The Fresno Bee, more than half said they had only “learned a little” about sex in school. Sixteen percent said they had learned nothing at all.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
The neighborhood a child grows up in may be the biggest contributor to teen pregnancy rates. And one way to reduce the number of teen pregnancies is to provide structure, like after-school activities, to teens in needy neighborhoods.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
Before the California Healthy Youth Act went into effect last year, Fresno Unified was one of a few school districts that didn’t teach comprehensive sex education and pushback against such lessons remains.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
While U.S. teen birth rates have continued to decrease across all races and ethnicities, disparities persist. In 2014, nearly 75 percent of the teen births in Fresno County California were to Hispanic mothers.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
For years, some school districts in California's Central Valley have been reluctant to teach comprehensive sex education. Worse, the valley's pregnancy and STD rates are some of the state's highest.
Picture of Monya De

An online health startup called Nurx bills itself as the "Uber for birth control." Dr. Monya De takes the site out for a spin, and finds she has some serious reservations along the way.

Picture of Becca  Aaronson

A Texas GOP plan to exclude 40 Planned Parenthood clinics from the state's Texas Woman’s Health Program has lead to fewer claims for birth control and wellness exams as well as lower overall enrollment numbers.

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