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Picture of Francisco Castro
No one in Venancio Martinez’s family had ever had the disease. He remembers feeling relatively good in its early stages and did not feel the need to go to the doctor to check himself regularly.
Picture of Kathy Jean Schultz

Should stem stells be regulated as drugs? The FDA will hold hearings this year to explore stem cell treatments it deems unproven.

Picture of Yvonne LaRose

It was embarrassing. I was undone. I kept my composure but also kept my voice at a very low volume. I hoped no one could hear us. Most of all, I hoped no one was paying attention to what we were doing and that we weren't making a scene. The last thing I wanted was for people to see her being needy b

Picture of Kate Long

Kate Long looks at the laundry list of problems that extra body fat can cause, including Alzheimer's Disease, sleep apnea and incontinence. This story is part of a Charleston Gazette series called "The Shape We're In."

Picture of Deborah Schoch

How one journalist learned to sit back and simply be a patient when she needed cataract surgery.

Picture of Kate Long

Think about this: More than 200,000 West Virginians have contracted a disease that kills people. About 69,000 of them don't know they have it.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

"You couldn't make up a story that good." Author Ricki Lewis talks how she reported and wrote her new nonfiction book about gene therapy.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Personal stories illustrate the very real effects of health policies in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Joe Goldeen

People living with diabetes in San Joaquin County may have cause for concern: The county ranks worst in the state for deaths caused by diabetes. Medical officials say the lack of education and resources are to blame.

Picture of Christina Elston

What is air pollution doing to our kids? If you live in L.A. County, and especially if you’ve driven back to the Los Angeles basin from somewhere else, you’ve seen it. A steely brown haze hangs over us for much of the year. We live in the smoggiest region in the United States (according to the South Coast Air Quality Management District), but for those raising children here it may not be top of mind. In some parts of the county, moms claw their way onto waiting lists for the “right” preschool while they are still pregnant. Concerns about finding the right neighborhood, the right school, about keeping kids away from gangs and drugs or getting them to turn off the Xbox and do some homework tend to take center stage. The air we breathe gets plenty of media coverage, but we tend to consider it more of an inconvenience than an emergency.

Yet at every stage of children’s lives – from their time in the womb until they’re ready to leave the nest – the pollution in the air impacts their health. 2010 California Health Journalism Fellow Christina Elston reports.

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Got a great idea for an ambitious reporting project on a California health issue?  Let us fund it.  Apply now for the 2019 California Fellowship, which provides $1,000 reporting grants and six months of expert mentoring to 20 journalists, plus community engagement grants of up to $2,000, plus specialized mentoring, to five.

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