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Brooklyn

Picture of Fred Mogul
New York City health officials are watching childbirth rates across the city — and trying to find ways to lower the risk for the most vulnerable group: African-American women.
Picture of Fred Mogul
Maimonides Hospital delivers more babies in a year than any other hospital in New York State. They also have some of the lowest complication rates, a distinction born from practice.
Picture of Fred Mogul
There’s a safety gap in New York City hospitals that puts the lives of black women at much greater risk than white women. Experts say better hospital culture can reduce the risks.
Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

Healthy food is in short supply in communities of color

Picture of Linda Perez

Second part of Linda Perez' series on the causes of, and efforts to prevent suicide among Latino teens in Georgia.

Picture of Pedro Frisneda

For many Mexican immigrants living in New York, working multiple jobs leaves little time for regular exercise. In addition, a heavy reliance on public transportation and a lack of rural areas means that physical activity is virtually nonexistent. Health experts cite this sedentary lifestyle as an emerging gateway to diabetes, especially among immigrants.

Picture of Pedro Frisneda

With limited access to affordable fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods, Mexicans living in New York are frequenting fast food restaurants instead of farmers' markets. The result is a spike in obesity and diabetes among this immigrant group.

 

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