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California,United States

Picture of Kelley Weiss

California’s second most expensive health and human services program, Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, was designed to help the elderly and disabled afford basic necessities. But for many older Californians it's not meeting that goal.

In the first of our two-part series, Senior Insecurity, we’ll look at how the deepest state budget cuts to SSI in a decade have impacted older disabled Californians. A growing number of them can’t afford enough food or are living on the streets. 

 

Picture of Kelley Weiss

California sends out about three billion dollars a year to the disabled and elderly so they can buy food and afford housing. But in the second part of our series, Senior Insecurity, Capital Public Radio found there's little oversight of this program.

Even though Supplemental Security Income - or SSI - is California's second most expensive health and human services program, the state doesn't track whether it's enough to live on or how people spend their money.

 

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. Scott Takasugi finally ran out of excuses.

The Sacramento plastic surgeon was accused of molesting his patients, some of whom were as young as 12.

His patients said that they came in for breast enhancements or reductions, yet Takasugi told them to take all their clothes off. Then he touched and photographed them. To explain this behavior, Takasugi told the Sacramento Bee:

What I did was misconstrued medical procedures.

Picture of William Heisel

It’s safe to say that most health writers pay attention when Tracy Weber and Charlie Ornstein publish something.

They have been called the Woodward and Bernstein of health reporting. The comparison fits because these two have few peers in their ability to dig for documents, cajole sources into talking and embarrass powerful public figures.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The Senate may be taking a temporary break from health reform, but a journalist’s quest for fresh angles on the topic never wanes. (If you’re looking for some ideas, check out my previous tips here.)

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

When Los Angeles Times reporter Lisa Girion and health policy consultant Peter Harbage talk about health reform and health insurance, the result is an exceedingly well-informed discussion with lots of concrete story ideas for journalists.

Picture of Nick  Vidinsky

View our interactive charts showing 2008  Cal/OSHA reported workplace deaths. You can look at fatalities by industry, job, gender, cause of death and location.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A loophole in California law means that insurers could require you to take a genetic test to qualify for long-term care insurance – and potentially deny coverage based on the results.

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Ace reporter Lisa Krieger of the San Jose Mercury will share how she stays on top of the story every day, and offer pro tips that will bolster your own coverage. Sign-up here!

In this webinar discussion, we’ll talk about what questions journalists should ask health systems to gauge their preparedness and understand their potential decisions on rationing care. Sign-up here!

Stuck reporting from home? This webinar will focus on helping reporters find health sources and affected people online, through social platforms and digital communities. Sign-up here!

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