Skip to main content.

California,United States

Picture of Christina Jewett

Nursing homes in California have reaped $880 million in new funding from a 2004 state law designed to help them hire more caregivers and boost wages. But many homes did just the opposite.

Picture of William Heisel

Maryn McKenna has lived inside the "hot zone" for much of her reporting career. She honed her craft at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where she was much admired for her coverage of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It takes skill to persuade any large government agency to give up some of its secrets, but McKenna did just that and turned them into fascinating stories. She has since taken the enviable career path of writing books.

Picture of William Heisel

What does it take for a doctor to lose his license in Arkansas?

Dr. Randeep Singh Mann appears to have pushed the envelope just about as far as it can go, and he is still holding an active medical license from that state.

Mann, an internist in Russellville, is accused of attacking the head of the Arkansas State Medical Board by planting a bomb in his driveway.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Health care reform, and the ideological, political and public health battles that surrounded it, reached a fever pitch in the media by the time the legislation reached the House of Representatives in March. Many members of ReportingonHealth were watching and chronicling these events closely. Here, a cross-section of reporters discusses their experience working on these complex stories.

Picture of Devin Maverick  Robins

Much of inland California is rural and poor, a sharp contrast with hip, upscale coastal life. Residents in the rural regions sometimes live with a high degree of pollution. Producer Devin Robins visited three women who became activists over concerns for their communities' health.

Picture of William Heisel

One doctor allowed her clinics in Santa Ana, California, to be used as front operations for selling highly addictive painkillers.

Another doctor agreed to be paid $2,000 a month for the use of his registration with the DEA so that the front operations could keep up their supply.

Another doctor was willing to rent his registration for half that.

All of them were caught red-handed by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. Medical Board of California investigations are not made public, but, so far, none of them have been disciplined in California.

Picture of Angilee Shah

This article was first published by Zócalo Public Square, and is reposted here with the author's permission.

Picture of William Heisel

Low on cash, his reputation shredded by patient complaints about botched plastic surgeries, Dr. Harrell Robinson must have felt he had a guardian angel when Magdalena Annan approached him.

Annan ran the beatific sounding Madre Maria Ines Teresa Health Center at 1523 Broadway Street in Santa Ana, which targeted Southern California immigrants.

Picture of William Heisel

Some physicians cater to the immigrant community out of public service or cultural affinity. Others, like Dr. Harrell Robinson, end up there because they ruined their own reputations with English-speaking patients.

The Southern California cosmetic surgeon shared an Anaheim office with Dr. Andrew Rutland, the doctor who is now accused in the death of Chinese immigrant Ying Chen.

Picture of William Heisel

Even a doctor with dead patients in his past can find startup capital.

When Dr. Andrew Rutland was trying to set up shop in the old "Modern Woman's Clinic" building in Chula Vista, he tapped a friend for a loan: Dr. W. Constantine Mitchell.

According to records from the California Office of Administrative Hearings, where Rutland's case before the medical board is currently being heard, Mitchell loaned Rutland $50,000 to help him start his practice.

Pages

Announcements

In this webinar, will look at how the COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in a terrifying new reality for domestic violence victims, how organizations and authorities are trying to innovate in response, and how reporters can cover the story in their community. Sign-up here!

The 2020 National Fellowship is going online!Got a great idea for a reporting project on the impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of virtual training in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth