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Cancer

Picture of Debra  Sherman

The most recent employment report from the U.S. Labor Department showed the job market remained tough in January. If it’s difficult for healthy individuals to get a job, what is it like for cancer survivors?

Picture of Steven Mittelman

Everybody knows that smoking causes cancer, and that obesity causes heart disease, but even most doctors and scientists I speak to have no idea about the very large effect obesity has on cancer.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

In my last blog post, I wrote about pain and addiction, and quoted my palliative care doctor. Some readers took that to mean that I am at the end of the road, so to speak, since I am calling for palliative care. No, I’m not! (At least I hope I’m not.)

Picture of William Heisel

USA Today's Liz Szabo knows that criticism comes with the territory, but she doesn't respond to name-calling. She will engage in constructive and civil conversation with readers who are genuinely concerned.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

I was a bit surprised by how readily this new physician I visited agreed to prescribe more pain medication for me. My previous experience before I was a cancer patient was that doctors were unwilling to prescribe highly addictive drugs — but they weren’t palliative care doctors, like him.

Picture of William Heisel

USA Today reporter Liz Szabo breaks news for a living. So she had to squeeze her investigation of Dr. Stanley Burzynski and the patients who died under his care into the few hours or minutes between breaking daily news.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

Exercise is good for cancer patients, doctors these days say. That’s an about-face from just a decade ago when they urged patients to conserve their flagging energy. 

Picture of Debra  Sherman

At a time when there are so many vital questions to ask, and research budgets everywhere are under attack, I wonder why well-meaning researchers pick obvious questions to ask. Is it easier to get funding? Are they cheaper to execute? Is the bar lower?

Picture of William Heisel

Liz Szabo's USA Today story -- Doctor accused of selling false hope to families -- is one of the best medical investigations I have read. Here are a few lessons from the piece.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

The oncologist is the person who will look after my cancer for the rest of my life, however long it lasts. I need to trust him or her implicitly. Just for starters, I need to trust the treatments prescribed for me will work, even if they make me feel sicker than I felt in the first place.

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Get the latest updates from top experts and a leading journalist tracking the story, as well as crucial context and insights for reporting responsibly on this fast-moving public health threat in our next webinar on Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET. Sign-up here!

Got a great idea for a reporting project on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of all-expenses-paid training at USC in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

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