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Cancer

Picture of Debra  Sherman

The genetic tree answers a lot of questions for the patient, as well as for family who must mix their care for the stricken with an understandable concern about where the cancer came from–and who might be next.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

A study of more than 300 patients suffering advanced cancer found that people who received spiritual support from religious communities tended to want aggressive end-of-life care.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

As a Reuters journalist I have been writing about medical technology and health care for more than a decade. I wrote those stories objectively and never imagined any would ever apply to me. Now, I have Stage 4 lung cancer.

Picture of Jill  Braden Balderas

When experienced health journalist Joanne Silberner realized she had a "huge" misconception about cancer in the developing world, she reported from three countries to shed light on the subject for readers and listeners.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Despite media exposes and a public backlash, a lot of meat and seafood is treated with less than savory methods to keep it looking fresh.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Researching, writing and submitting papers to medical journals--and reworking and finessing them if accepted--is a demanding, time consuming job which drug companies have made into pay dirt.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Like adults, children are suffering from "middle-age spread" -- too many calories and not enough exercise. And like adults, they are taking pills to accommodate the conditions instead of making lifestyle changes.

Picture of Carlos Javier  Ortiz

Chicago Photographer Carlos Javier Ortiz, a 2012 National Health Journalism Fellow, has been chronicling the impact of violence on Chicago youth for six years.

Picture of Amy DePaul

Good health is almost always associated with wealth and education, and yet low-income, newly arrived Latinos with neither of these are generally healthier than whites by a number of measures - what's known as the “Latino Health Paradox.” But within decades of their arrival, their health declines.

Picture of Cara DeGette

The Globeville area of Denver once attracted immigrants from around the world to work the dangerous smelter jobs, and at the adjoining rail yards, and the meatpacking operations that came later. It's now hoping to clean up its environment and experience a renaissance of reconstruction and rebirth.

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Get the latest updates from top experts and a leading journalist tracking the story, as well as crucial context and insights for reporting responsibly on this fast-moving public health threat in our next webinar on Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET. Sign-up here!

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