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Picture of Wendy Ruderman
Data recently made public by Philadelphia's school district showed that nearly 15 percent of water samples taken from school drinking water outlets had lead higher than the legal level for home tap water. This needs to change.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
In the wake of reporting from two National Fellows, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said Monday that the city will begin to enforce a four-year-old law that requires landlords to certify that their properties are lead-safe before renting to families with young kids.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
With more than 90 percent of Philadelphia homes built before the nation's 1978 lead-paint ban, the city struggles to eradicate childhood lead poisoning and ranks among the top U.S. cities for children at risk.
Picture of Kerry Klein
Richard Nuwintore's sentence in the California prison system has ended, but the valley fever infection he picked up while doing time is a life sentence. The state is now working to lower the risk for inmates.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
Children who were poisoned by lead are now suffering the effects as young adults. The question many parents are asking is how will the school system help these students?
Picture of Darryl Holliday
While the government banned lead-based paint in 1978, more than 75 percent of houses in Chicago were built before 1970, affecting children with lead poisoning.
Picture of Harold Pierce
“Valley fever is almost certainly underreported, due to physicians and the public not being familiar with the disease,” said one infectious disease specialist. Reliable estimates of valley fever cases are still lacking.
Picture of Harold Pierce
New sensors in development at the CDC could provide a breakthrough in valley fever detection and prevention throughout the Southwestern United States.
Picture of William Heisel
The U.S. has moved decisively toward fluoridation in water, which shows that it’s possible to move out of an area of doubt and confusion and into an era where good science is accepted and basic public health measures are taken.
Picture of Gisela Telis
This story was reported as a project for USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship.

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