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Chicago

Picture of Chinyere Amobi
Pharmacy deserts are a growing problem in Chicago. Tribune reporter Eseosa Olumhense discusses how she reported on the worrying trend.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
For an ambitious project on lead in Chicago, City Bureau started with the question: "How do we as journalists meet people where they are?" The answer included a text-message service that responds with lead test data for the user's community.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
Children who have been exposed to lead poisoning have access to the Early intervention program that offers resources ranging from speech therapy to nutrition services.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
Children who were poisoned by lead are now suffering the effects as young adults. The question many parents are asking is how will the school system help these students?
Picture of Darryl Holliday
While the government banned lead-based paint in 1978, more than 75 percent of houses in Chicago were built before 1970, affecting children with lead poisoning.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
Drinking water have been contaminated with lead. Chicago residents and property owners are expected to deal with the problem. Experts are pressing the city to make some changes and take action.
Picture of Ryan White

How tightly does childhood adversity correlate with later-in-life measures of well-being? A new study looks at public school kids who grew up in some of Chicago's poorest neighborhoods and finds some disheartening patterns.

Picture of Kari Lydersen

Mental health care is playing a starring role in a movement to unseat Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. After major budget cuts, members of the City Council’s Progressive Caucus are demanding to reopen shuttered clinics by adding $2.2 million to the budget the Council will vote on November 13 .

Picture of Kari Lydersen

Mental health providers in Illinois acknowledge that the state is in a dire budget situation. They say they have become more resourceful, finding ways to continue serving their patients and hope that the Affordable Care Act will help their situation.

Picture of Linda Marsa

In 2010, when I started researching the health effects of climate change for my book, Fevered, it seemed like this looming threat wasn’t on the nation’s radar screens. I was pessimistic that changes could be made in time to avert catastrophe. But as I drilled down, I was pleasantly surprised to disc

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Got a great idea for a reporting project on the health of underserved communities in California or on the performance of the state's health and social safety nets?  We're offering reporting grants of $2,000 to $10,000, plus six months of mentoring, to up to eight individual journalists, newsrooms or cross-newsroom collaboratives.  Deadline to apply:  September 20.

Interested in honing your data analysis and visualization skills and taking home a reporting grant of $2,000-$3,500? Dates: October 23-26. Deadline to apply: August 26. Click on the headline to learn more.

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