Skip to main content.

chief executive

Picture of Becca  Aaronson

In the 2013 legislative session, lawmakers sought to mitigate the impact of 2011 budget cuts with the largest financial package for women’s health services in state history. Yet, women’s health advocates have raised concerns that the financing does not go far enough and about abortion restrictions.

Picture of Becca  Aaronson

This year, there's no political fireworks or high-octane drama like the 2011 fight over women’s health care and abortion in Texas. Democrats will not die on the sword of bringing Planned Parenthood back into the fold, and Republicans will not put up additional barriers to women’s access to care.

Picture of Melissa Sweet

The controversy sparks questions about corporate influence and the new ways we fund journalism.

Picture of Ryan McNeill

So how can a hospital be judged so deficient by federal inspectors, yet rank among the best in U.S. News & World Report?

It's all in the methodology.

 
Picture of Sarah Arnquist

Records show that the financial troubles that forced the closure of Mee Memorial Hospital began as early as a year prior. Despite ambitions to deliver adequate patient care, the hospital's money problems continued to worsen.

Picture of William Heisel

Although Doctors Behaving Badly tends to focus on exactly what you would expect, its mission is to make people aware of the many ways that patients are left unprotected.

There are nearly 1 million licensed, practicing physicians nationwide. Antidote has no ability to count how many are “behaving badly,” but it is safe to say that only a slim minority are tainting the reputation of the medical community. Doctors who abuse, injure or kill patients are the surrogate markers for an illness in the physician discipline system. They are not the illness.

Picture of Christina Jewett

Nursing homes in California have reaped $880 million in new funding from a 2004 state law designed to help them hire more caregivers and boost wages. But many homes did just the opposite.

Announcements

The Center for Health Journalism is dedicated to supporting journalists covering two of the biggest stories of our time — the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and inequities in America. We provide reporters with intensive training instituteswebinars and tips about craft and content and are providing deep and sustained support for reporters and their newsrooms in this historic and difficult moment. You can donate through the USC web portal at this link. Pressed for time? You can also text to donate! No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth