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chief medical officer

Picture of Giana  Magnoli

Getting coverage for the uninsured is a big part of the federal health-care reform, which goes into effect Jan. 1. Those just getting insured could require a huge amount of care and referrals, which stands to overburden providers until the system stabilizes.

Picture of William Heisel

The story about Medicare removing information about hospital-acquired conditions from its Hospital Compare website appears to be changing. I'm still left wondering who started the wheels in motion for the original story about the data. The reporter had to have gotten this idea somewhere.

Picture of William Heisel

The Bakersfield Californian recently took on one of the most ambitious health care quality projects I have seen attempted by an outlet outside of the really big markets. One reporter, Kellie Schmitt, wanted to answer two questions: whether most of the doctors in Kern County were from another country and whether that mattered.

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

While many states make information related to medical care complications public, Oregon does not. That means that the best information about an individual hospital’s quality and safety may be kept from the public.

Picture of Gary Schwitzer

A new analysis shows how commonly doctors don't understand cancer screening statistics. That's no excuse for journalists not to do a better job in learning the basics and educating their readers, viewers, and listeners.

Picture of Kent Bottles

Anyone who is concerned about the future transformation of the United States clinical delivery system should pay attention to the Care Innovations Summit.

Picture of Ryan McNeill

Parkland Memorial Hospita has for years been one of the state’s worst-performing hospitals on a broad federal measure of patient safety, a Dallas Morning News analysis shows. Hospital representatives accepted the accuracy of the calculations, but they questioned how well the data reflected actual performance and current hospital conditions. 

 
Picture of Rochelle Sharpe

An iWatch News investigation documents $1.9 billion in wasted federal health care expenditures.

Picture of William Heisel

William Heisel interviews Delaware journalist Jonathan Starkey about how he uncovered life-threatening denials of diagnostic tests by an insurer.

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