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Child abuse

Picture of Teresa Sforza
When horrific cases of child abuse make headlines, social workers are often painted as neglecting their duty. But is a system that protects parental rights and keeping families intact really to blame?
Picture of Giles Bruce
The initial statistics shocked me. It turns out, I hadn’t seen anything yet.
Picture of Lisa Gartner
How Pennsylvania failed to protect boys from abuse at Glen Mills and other state-licensed juvenile programs.
Picture of Giles Bruce
Prevention is always king, but what does the evidence say about the best way to treat kids who have already suffered abuse?
Picture of Giles Bruce
There’s more information known about every man, woman and child in the U.S. than ever before, in digital form. Why not use that data to protect the youngest, most vulnerable members of society?
Picture of Anna Claire Vollers
While child abuse and neglect take different forms, more than half of Alabama’s child abuse and neglect victims – 52 percent – experience physical abuse.
Picture of Giles Bruce
Kateri Whiteside looked at the pictures of her six kids on the wall: boys and girls, from toddlers to adults. She hasn't seen some of them for years.
Picture of Giles Bruce
What if the United States treated child abuse and neglect as if they were deadly diseases?
Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
Ashley wanted the abuse to stop. But Butch, her adoptive father, was always around.
Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
Ashley stepped out of Sandy’s red-and-white van. The 10-year-old didn’t say a word, didn’t glance back at Sandy, her adoptive mother. And she refused to meet the hazel eyes of the man waiting in front of her.

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