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childhood obesity

Picture of Vikaas Shanker
A story of why it pays to keep analyzing the data, even if it isn’t cooperative at first.
Picture of Vikaas Shanker
Childhood obesity is a particularly difficult public health problem because if left unchecked, it will lead to many significant medical issues later in life.
Picture of Ryan White
Earlier this week, Harvard researchers released a study that makes a downright gloomy prediction: Nearly six in 10 of today’s children will be obese by age 35, if current trends continue.
Picture of Antonia Gonzales
Native organizations and advocates across the United States are seeking to get young Native people to switch from drinking sugary beverages, such as soda and energy drinks, to water.
Picture of Ryan White

There has been a bevy of headlines on child obesity this week, triggered by a new study casting doubt on earlier reports of drops in early childhood obesity rates. But real story is rather more complicated than the headlines suggest.

Picture of Elizabeth  Marigliano

Over the past few decades, the number of obese people around the world has steadily increased. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that in 2014 over 1.9 billion adults were overweight, with over 600 million of these being classified as obese....

Picture of Ryan White

This week brought news of a compromise in the battle over new school lunch standards. It comes quick on the heels of new research that questions critics' claims of tossed food and lost revenues.

Picture of Ryan White

Just in time for Halloween, a frightful new study lends further support to the idea that calories from sugar are more likely to worsen metabolic health. This comes close on the heels of news reports that Mexico's 2013 tax on soft drinks has lowered soda sales there.

Picture of Patricia Wight

In Maine, one in three children are overweight, and about half of poor children ages 10 to 17 are obese. Programs such as "Let's Go!" have tried to combat the trends by spreading messages of healthy eating and exercise, but widespread problems persist. Why the impasse?

Picture of Kathleen  Page

Children consume a bigger proportion of their daily calories from added sugars than adults, and the concerns go beyond nutrition. New research suggests that fructose can activate the brain's reward regions and generate hunger and cravings for other high-calorie foods.

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