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children's health

Picture of Ryan White

When it comes to a hospitalized child, it’s fair to say no one is keeping tabs more closely than the mom or dad perched bedside. It’s no surprise they’re often to the first to catch medical errors, as new research suggests.

Picture of Ryan White

The American Academy of Pediatrics announced a new policy this week urging parents to read to their kids starting at birth, and for pediatricians to recommend the practice during doctor visits. The policy reflects recent research that stresses the importance of early literacy in child development.

Picture of Ryan White

Dateline NBC recently examined why families in poorer zip codes in places such as New York City are hit far harder by asthma than upper income children. A big part of the problem is public housing.

Picture of Ryan White

The Nurse Family Partnership, an early intervention program which features home-visits for at risk children, has a track record of better health outcomes and reducing problems among poorer moms and kids. But it isn't a cure-all for the problems darkening the prospects of these children.

Picture of Ryan White

The language gap between rich and poor children may be well known but new research suggests the gap may be taking shape earlier than anyone expected.

Picture of David Danelski

Moreno Valley, city staff members are processing plans by a local developer to build a warehousing hub covering the equivalent of 700 football fields. Its a testing ground in the struggle to balance the need for jobs and the imperative for clean air.

Picture of David Danelski

The Golden State's air quality has improved dramatically since the 1970s, but still, on more than 100 days a year, Southern California is failing to meet clean air standards. Children appear to suffer the most with pollution laying the groundwork for multiple health problems.

Picture of David Alexander, M.D.

California’s population of children is shrinking, and that means some big changes ahead for the Golden State. What's happening in your state?

Picture of Elaine Korry

More than a million California children who currently lack health insurance will qualify for coverage under the Affordable Care Act. But children’s advocates are concerned that some kids won’t get the best coverage.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

It's great to get a national reporting internship. It's even better when you land an important lead poisoning story on the front page of USA Today - after only a month on the job.

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