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A San Luis Obispo doctor's prescription for weight loss has proven effective, but are weight loss drugs safe? Experts caution against the potential risks and downsides.

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With limited access to affordable fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods, Mexicans living in New York are frequenting fast food restaurants instead of farmers' markets. The result is a spike in obesity and diabetes among this immigrant group.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 3: In a sedentary country

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Did a federal task force ignore evidence that more frequent mammograms save lives? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Here’s what we’re checking out today:

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Antronette K. Yancey is a professor in the Department of Health Services, UCLA School of Public Health, and is Co‐Director of its Center to Eliminate Health Disparities. Dr.Yancey's primary research interests are in chronic disease prevention and adolescent health promotion. She returned to academia full‐time in 2001 after five years in public health practice, first as Director of Public Health for the city of Richmond, VA, and, until recently, as Director of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. Dr.

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Here’s what we’re reading and watching today:

Air Quality: Here’s one instance where wealth isn’t linked to health: ScienceDaily reports on a study finding that homes in both poor and affluent California communities had similarly high levels of endocrine disruptors. These disruptors can affect the endocrine system and lead to fertility and infant development problems among other health risks.

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As Congress slugs it out over health-care reform this week, hopeful eyes are on Grand Junction, CO., where low-cost, high-quality near-universal health care is the norm.

You can find my new five-part series on Grand Junction’s health care system here.  

The doctors in Grand Junction, a western Colorado city of 53,000, say their system can become a national model, and there are doctors in dozens of communities ready to replicate the system that uses a non-profit insurance provider but allows doctors to work for profit.

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Part 1: Innovative ways are sought to get patients to follow their treatment 

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From the opening keynote of this week's National Health Journalism Fellowship seminar, prevention and health beyond just health care have been common themes. Today's afternoon panelists gave examples of programs that take simple, novel approaches to integrating physical activity into people's daily lives.

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