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Cleveland

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This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Rachel Dissell and Brie Zeltner, participants in the 2018 National Fellowship....
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This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. 
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Cleveland youth shared this week personal stories to underscore the importance of the projects they proposed to police, community and nonprofit leaders in their city.
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"My neighborhood has too many candlelight vigils for victims of police brutality or from neglect or incompetence from law enforcement who were not around enough to prevent the situations in the first place."
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This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship....
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
As part of The Plain Dealer's "Dear Cleveland" series, the newspaper is bringing young voices to the forefront of the community conversation.
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A new project from The Plain Dealer will listen to the voices of Cleveland children sharing what it's like to grow up, play, go to school and live in this city — and what needs to change. But some early reader responses have been troubling.
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. Other stories in the series include: Dear Cleveland: To learn, you first have to listen
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Despite decades of effort and millions in taxpayer money, Cleveland’s kids continue to have some of the highest rates of lead poisoning in the country. Bad housing and urban blight only compound their stress and suffering.

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The Cleveland Plain Dealer’s Brie Zeltner and Rachel Dissel are putting the issue of lead poisoning in children back on the map, publishing a deeply reported series of stories on the issue this week. The ambitious project is worth a closer look.

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