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colon cancer

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New online communities are offering patients support and guidance to an extent not previously possible. That can be a huge boon for colon cancer patients, who might otherwise find themselves isolated and afraid.

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KCRW reporter Avishay Artsy set out to report on ethnic disparities in cancer outcomes. After originally planning on covering three groups, he found he was able to tell more compelling stories by narrowing his focus to African-Americans and colon cancer.

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In a town whose problems already include air pollution, water contamination and poverty, the California drought has spurred a growing health crisis, worsening respiratory conditions and burdening those with other illnesses, such as 49-year-old Manuel León.

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Stigma is one reason that African Americans are less likely to get a colonoscopy. But a recent study found that doctors may be partly responsible as African Americans are more likely than any other racial and ethnic group to say that their doctor never recommended colon cancer screening.

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Each year, about 140,000 Americans are diagnosed with colon cancer, and more than 50,000 die from it. That’s bad news, but for African-Americans, it’s even worse. KCRW reporter Avishay Artsy explains why.

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Colorectal cancer is preventable. But the invasive test that’s required for early detection often scares people. Researchers say a much higher percentage of African-Americans, compared with other groups, don’t sign up for the procedure. The consequences can be fatal.

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Duane Middleton died shortly after a routine colonoscopy. Then his life insurance provider denied his wife any benefits, a decision later held up in court. So how could three judges conclude that Middleton's death didn't qualify as an "accident"?

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Despite the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act, many Americans remain suspicious -- even fearful -- about the law.

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New colon cancer screening guidelines, a new study on using anti-depressants during pregnancy, new drug tests for sailors and more from our Daily Briefing.

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An iWatch News investigation documents $1.9 billion in wasted federal health care expenditures.

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Do the competing bills put forward by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sens. Charles Grassley and Ron Wyden have a chance of becoming law? This webinar will give an overview of the proposals and weigh in on the future of the battle to curb soaring drug prices. Sign-up here!

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