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Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

From hospital systems to pharmacies, this summer’s health headlines have been filled with tales of consolidation. And no where has the “merger mania” been more evident than the insurance sector. Health policy expert Paul Ginsburg helps us break down the trend in this Q&A.

Picture of Kathleen O'Brien

New Jersey’s governor, Chris Christie, has walked a fine line in his decisions about the Affordable Care Act: He accepted Washington’s offer to expand Medicaid, yet declined to set up a state exchange. (And even turned his back on a $7 million grant to help residents learn about their options on hea

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

The Obama administration is finally addressing the expensive, dangerous and usually unnecessary psychiatric drugs that are footed by taxpayers in federal entitlement programs. It has proposed that insurers may limit Medicare coverage of certain classes of drugs.

Picture of Alonso Yañez

In 2014, fellows Alonso Yáñez and Annabelle Sedano collaborated on a project highlighting shortcomings in detention facilities for undocumented immigrants operated by for-profit companies. As Obama reconsiders outsourcing detention centers, this project offers early warnings of problems to come.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

The data on the much-lauded Patient Centered Medical Home approach, a cornerstone of ACA, shows that it is expensive, onerously bureaucratic, a drain on health care resources, especially for primary care providers, and a distraction from health care delivery.

Picture of Erika  Beras

Los primeros meses en la vida de un refugiado en EE. UU. están cargados de nuevas experiencias. Y también de visitas al médico. Toda la atención inicial está cubierta por los servicios de asistencia médica. Pero cuando finaliza esa cobertura, los refugiados pueden seguir teniendo problemas de salud.

Picture of Erika  Beras

The first few months of a refugee’s life in the U.S. are filled with new experiences. And with doctor’s visits. That initial care is covered by eight months of medical assistance, but refugees may still have outstanding health issues and no way to pay for them.

Picture of William Heisel

It’s easy to fall into clichés and misinformation when writing about the end of life. Here are my five favorite ideas from last week's Association of Health Care Journalists webinar on the subject.

Picture of The Reporting on Health Collaborative

Valley fever is a drain on taxpayers. An estimated 60 percent of valley fever-related hospitalizations - resulting in charges of close to $2 billion over 10 years in California alone - are covered by government programs.

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